infrastructure

Interior moves to speed energy development on formerly protected Utah land
Plans pave way for areas removed from national monuments to be made available for logging, drilling, mining

White Canyon in Natural Bridges National Monument, which borders the Bears Ears National Monument outside Blanding, Utah, on June 15, 2019. (George Frey/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump drew the ire of tribes and environmentalists when he issued proclamations in December 2017 significantly reducing the size of Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears national monuments, two sites designated by previous Democratic Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama

[Obama declares Bears Ears national monument while Utah lawmakers pledge fight]

Infrastructure plan could point to sea change for schools
Federal role in public school construction opposed by conservatives

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduced the Democrats’ infrastructure plan on Jan. 30. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The nation’s roads and bridges may be falling down, but its schools aren’t far behind.

So education proponents paid attention last week when, unveiling a $760 billion legislative infrastructure framework, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested that any infrastructure package would ultimately include federal dollars for school construction.

Trump scales down once-grand infrastructure ambitions
Infrastructure gets passing mention on State of the Union address; Democrats' ambitious proposal not mentioned at all

Infrastructure is among the areas where Trump and congressional Democrats don’t see eye-to-eye. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump used 189 words of his 2018 State of the Union address to call for a $1.5 trillion investment in U.S. infrastructure.

On Tuesday night, the former real estate mogul signaled how much times have changed.

For Senate GOP, impeachment impedes legislative agenda — that may not exist
Senate likely returns to judicial nominations after impeachment trial

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, arrives to the Senate carriage entrance of the Capitol before the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s been a constant refrain from Republican senators over the last two weeks: The impeachment trial is blocking us from addressing our legislative agenda.

“While this case is pending, we can’t do anything else,” Texas Republican John Cornyn complained earlier this week, postulating that paralyzing the Senate with impeachment proceedings was part of House Democrats’ strategy.

Ambitious infrastructure plan hits reality check: How to pay for it
Disagreements illustrate how difficult it will be to bring plan to fruition

Rep. John B. Larson, D-Conn., leaves the Capitol on Feb. 28, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On Wednesday morning, House Democrats presented an ambitious vision for a massive infusion of federal dollars in the nation’s infrastructure. 

By Wednesday afternoon, members of the House Ways and Means Committee illustrated how difficult it will be to bring that plan to fruition.

House Democrats tout five-year, $760 billion infrastructure plan
GOP members offer infrastructure ideas as well, urge bipartisan legislation

Democratic Reps. Frank Pallone Jr., Richard E. Neal and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at a news conference Wednesday to announce an ambitious infrastructure framework. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats on Wednesday unveiled an ambitious five-year, $760 billion infrastructure framework, part of a concentrated election-year effort to show they can pursue aggressive legislation even as they make a case for the Senate to remove President Donald Trump from office.

“These are not message bills,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “We are hoping we’ll have the support of Republicans and the president of the United States.”

Puerto Rico earthquake supplemental under discussion in House
HUD ignored a Sept. 4 deadline set by Congress

A Puerto Rican flag waves on top of a pile of rubble as debris is removed from a main road in Guanica, P.R., on Jan. 8, one day after an earthquake hit the island. (Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images)

 

Updated 4:39 p.m. House Appropriations Democrats are looking at a possible emergency spending package to provide additional aid to Puerto Rico following a series of earthquakes since late last year, including a 5.2 magnitude quake Wednesday.

Hoyer: House priorities for 2020 include health care, infrastructure, climate, redistricting
Legislative action also planned on appropriations, defense, education, housing, modernizing Congress

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer is outlining a busy legislative agenda for 2020. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats in 2020 plan to pass legislation on top party priorities like health care, infrastructure and climate as well as more under-the-radar subjects like modernizing Congress and redistricting — all while trying to fully fund the government on time for the first time in 24 years, Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer said.

The No. 2 Democrat, who is in charge of the floor schedule, outlined his legislative priorities for the year in an interview with CQ Roll Call. The aforementioned issues were among a long list that Hoyer said Democrats plan to pursue in the second session of the 116th Congress. Others the Maryland Democrat mentioned include education, taxes, the annual defense and intelligence authorizations, and reauthorizations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and National Flood Insurance Program.

Trump administration proposal would ease environmental impact reviews for federal projects
Proposal raises stakes for environmentalists fearful of what changes could mean for efforts to combat climate change

A Trump administration proposal would expand the number of projects like pipelines and fossil fuel drilling sites that are eligible to avoid comprehensive environmental impact studies. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Lawmakers unveil two mega spending packages
Health taxes to be repealed, tobacco age raised in year-end deal

From left, Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., along with Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, not pictured, announced on Thursday that they had reached a deal on a spending agreement before government funding runs out at the end of this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated Dec. 16 at 6:05 p.m.

House appropriators filed two mega spending packages for floor consideration Tuesday after hammering out last-minute details over the weekend.