lgbt

In her congressional goodbye, Katie Hill worried about letting down young girls. Now that’s a change
When was the last time a man in power apologized for letting down other men and young boys?

Young girls heard Katie Hill apologize for letting them down. That’s something young boys rarely hear from misbehaving male politicians, Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Katie Hill said, “I’m sorry,” a lot. In a speech that was not quite seven and a half minutes long, that stood out.

With a public impeachment inquiry now underway and a torrent of names and made-for-TV characters moving in and out of the spotlight, few remember that one of the votes approving this step was the last cast by Hill. The freshman congresswoman resigned her seat as she was about to face an ethics investigation after accusations that she was having a sexual relationship with a congressional aide. She denied that, though she admitted to one with a campaign staffer that she said was inappropriate though not rule-breaking.

Immigrant ‘Dreamers’ look to Supreme Court, Congress for help
Supreme Court considers DACA cases

Immigration rights demonstrators hold signs in front of the Trump International Hotel in Washington in September 2017 to oppose the president’s decision to end the DACA program for “dreamers.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Samuel Cervantes can’t ever imagine returning to Mexico. He hasn’t been back since his family moved to Houston when he was 5. He now fears being deported if the federal government ends the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

He also fears for his life if forced to return to a country he barely even remembers. 

Why Katie Hill had to go
California Democrat couldn’t stay on in a chamber that had promised to change its ways

With the new rules in place regarding relationships between lawmakers and their staff, California Rep. Katie Hill had no choice but to resign, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — There is nothing worse than watching a person you’re rooting for make a mistake. In the case of former Rep. Katie Hill, the talented newcomer made a major mistake when she engaged in a relationship with a campaign staffer leading up to the 2018 midterm elections. She was right to resign her seat last week because of it.

Hill’s mistake was not simply having an affair, especially in this case when the relationship seems to have been consensual and even something her husband was aware of and participated in. But the California Democrat’s choice to start and continue a relationship with a young staffer on her congressional campaign happened at the very time that other women on Capitol Hill were fighting to protect staffers long subjected to sexual harassment by their bosses there.

Pete Buttigieg tries to solve his South Carolina puzzle
As his Iowa poll numbers rise, South Bend mayor is stuck in single digits in Palmetto State

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg attends a worship service at the Kenneth Moore Transformation Center in Rock Hill, S.C., on Sunday. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

[OPINION] ROCK HILL, S.C. — Why was South Bend, Indiana, mayor and Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg in South Carolina over the weekend, with a busy schedule that included tailgating at a historically black college homecoming and delivering remarks at an AME Zion worship service?

“To say that I want to be the president who can pick up the pieces, that we’ve got to be ready not just to defeat this president but to guide the country forward,” he confidently told me. “I have my eyes on that moment and what America’s going to need.”

Congressional inaction drives LGBT rights case at Supreme Court
Court to hear arguments over whether protections based on ‘sex’ apply to gay, lesbian and transgender workers

A case before the Supreme Court on Tuesday could have sweeping social implications since 28 states have no express protections for LGBT employee rights. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court confronts a major civil rights issue Tuesday over how broadly the justices should read the word “sex” in a 55-year-old anti-discrimination law — and a key aspect is Congress’ current push to clarify that the law covers LGBT individuals.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits private companies from discriminating against employees on the basis of “sex,” seen at the time as a historic step for women’s rights.

SOTU Guests Obergefell, Davis Highlight Gay Rights Divide

Activists celebrate the Supreme Court decision recognizing same-sex marriage in all 50 states. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If there are two people who represent opposite poles in the gay marriage debate, it's Supreme Court plaintiff Jim Obergefell and Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis. And they'll both be in the House chamber for the State of the Union on Tuesday night.  

Obergefell, the named plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case that declared same-sex marriages be recognized in all 50 states, will be seated in a place of prominence as a guest of first lady Michelle Obama. Davis, who made headlines last year for refusing to recognize a gay marriage license after the court's decision, will also be in the gallery.  

Former Divinity Student Coons: Faith Informs Politics

Coons, once a divinity student, says he's reconciled faith and politics. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Pope Francis’ focus on issues such as climate change, immigration and economic inequality is being credited with making religion more attractive for progressives around the world.  

But there's always been room enough in Christianity, Sen. Chris Coons would argue, to balance a life of faith with concerns about the environment and social justice.  

Gay Marriage Tussle Not David Bunning's First Brush With Infamy

Bunning, and his wife Kay, talk to Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, before his nomination hearing for the federal bench. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning’s decision Thursday to punish Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses she maintains conflict with her religious beliefs isn’t the only time the legal professional has been cast in an unflattering light.  

Per media reports, protestors were stunned by Bunning’s brushing aside — “One minister called the ruling unjust, saying religious freedom had been trampled on,” according to Gannett scribes — of Davis’ opposition to same-sex coupling.  

Free Your Mind at Comic-Con

Lewis is heading to Comic-Con to discuss "March Book Two." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Attending Comic-Con International can certainly be about granting the imagination carte blanche to explore every fevered dream and act out the most outlandish childhood fantasies.  

But there also exist opportunities — albeit typically overshadowed by the elaborate cosplaying and relentless corporate focus-testing — to think big thoughts and ruminate about where we’re all headed as a society.