politics

Grimm Compares Migrant Children’s Conditions to ‘Day Care’ Dropoff
Rep. Donovan, who Grimm is challenging for his old seat, also defended family separation policy

Former Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., compared the conditions for migrant children separated from their parents on the border to child day care. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Republican Rep. Michael G. Grimm of New York dismissed the cries of migrant children separated from their families on the border as equivalent to the weeping of kids being dropped off at day care.

“I can take you to any nursery and you’re going to hear the exact same things. As a mother leaves to go to work and has to leave her child at day care, you’re going to hear those exact same things,” Grimm said during an interview with local news media Tuesday.

Clark Says She Would ‘Politely Decline’ Help From Bill Clinton
Massachusetts congresswoman she hopes other Democrats will follow suit

Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., said she would not help former President Bill Clinton's help on the campaign trail.. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Katherine M. Clark said she would say thanks, but no thanks if she was offered help on the campaign trail by former President Bill Clinton.

Speaking on Boston Public Radio, Clark said “I would politely decline” if she were asked.

An Ex-Con Looks for a Comeback in New York’s 11th District
But first, Michael Grimm needs to defeat Rep. Dan Donovan in the GOP primary

Former Rep. Michael G. Grimm, R-N.Y., is challenging Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., for his old seat in New York’s 11th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been 90 years since someone with a criminal conviction was elected to the House. But one felon could jump-start his congressional comeback if he wins a Republican primary next week.

GOP voters in New York’s 11th District head to the polls Tuesday to choose between Rep. Dan Donovan and former Rep. Michael G. Grimm, who resigned his seat in early 2015 and served seven months in prison after pleading guilty to tax evasion.

Court’s Gerrymandering Punt Looks to Land in North Carolina
Current House map was drawn by partisan greed, its author says. Is that unconstitutional?

Gerrymandering activists gather on the steps of the Supreme Court on March 28 as the court prepares to hear the a Maryland partisan gerrymandering case. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When it sidestepped an opening to decide the future of partisan gerrymandering this week, the Supreme Court may have turned a tobacco grower and farm equipment dealer into one of the most important people in American politics.

The farmer and John Deere salesman, 47-year-old David Lewis, is also an influential state legislator who represents the rural geographic center of North Carolina — the state that will now be Ground Zero in the three-decadeslong debate over whether electoral boundaries can ever be drawn with so much partisan motivation that they’re unconstitutional.

House Immigration Compromise Faces Dim Prospects Amid Conservative Opposition
No compelling case for Freedom Caucus members to vote for it, Meadows says

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, is among the conservatives opposed to a compromise immigration bill that President Donald Trump has endorsed and that the House is expected to vote on this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Republican immigration bill negotiated in recent weeks by cross sections of the House GOP Conference faces dim prospects for passage after several conservatives indicated opposition to the measure Tuesday.

House Republican leaders invited President Donald Trump to the Capitol on Tuesday evening to try to sell the legislation to the conference. And while Trump said he supports the compromise measure — along with one by House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte that most conservatives in the conference prefer — it does not appear to have swayed enough conservatives to ensure the bill’s passage.

Can Aruna Miller Upset the Largest Self-Funder in House Race History?
Maryland hopeful has many of the credentials that have boosted Democratic women this year

Maryland state Del. Aruna Miller greets voters at an early polling place in Gaithersburg, Md, on June 18. She stands behind the electioneering line which prevents a candidate from being too close to a voting site. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

GAITHERSBURG, Md. — If there’s one electoral trend from 2018 so far, it’s that Democratic women are winning primaries in House districts across the country.

But in Maryland, which has no women in its congressional delegation for the first time in more than 40 years, the most competitive woman running for the Democratic nomination in the open 6th District is at a big disadvantage.

Capitol Ink | Space Force One

Judge Rules Ann Kirkpatrick Lives in Tucson, Can Stay on Primary Ballot
Arizona Democrat is seeking a comeback from 2nd District

Former Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick is seeking a comeback from Arizona’s 2nd District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Arizona Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick does live in Tucson, a judge ruled Tuesday in a lawsuit challenging her residency in the 2nd District. The lawsuit, financed by one of her Democratic primary opponents, had attempted to remove her from the primary ballot.

Former state Rep. Matt Heinz, the losing 2016 Democratic nominee for the seat, helped fund the lawsuit that alleged Kirkpatrick falsely claimed in campaign documents that she lived in Tucson. Candidates are not required to live in the districts they are running in, but the plaintiffs alleged Kirkpatrick violated state law that required candidates to accurately reflect their residency on nominating papers.

‘Trump Show’ Makes Tour Stop in Capitol Basement
President calls out Mark Sanford, opts against sticking to immigration

Speaker Paul D. Ryan escorts President Donald Trump to the House Republicans’ meeting Tuesday in the Capitol basement. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans might have gone into their Tuesday evening meeting with President Donald Trump expecting a discussion about immigration policy, but what they got was an episode of what might be dubbed “The Trump Show.”

The president did discuss dueling immigration bills crafted by members of the GOP conference. And he urged them to send him a bill that closes what his team dubs “loopholes” that he claims compelled his administration to institute a zero-tolerance program that prosecutes all adult migrants who try to enter the United States illegally, a misdemeanor, even if they arrive with minor children.

Report: Competitive U.S. House Races Spell Good Fortune for Broadcast Stations
Campaign spending on TV ads highest of any election cycle

Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., appears in an “Estruth for Congress” ad on television in October 1995. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Amid a fierce battle for control of the House, candidates are spending around 50 percent more than they did at this point in the 2014 election cycle, according to a Bloomberg report.

Due to an unusually large number of retirements in the House this year, candidates have come out in large numbers in districts where they will not face the typical uphill primary battle against an incumbent. Sixty-four Representatives are retiring, have resigned, or are running in another election this year, according to Roll Call’s Departing Members