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Trump — not lawmakers — set to be biggest challenge for new legislative affairs chief Ueland
No matter who runs Hill shop, president’s approach is ‘very unlikely to yield results,’ expert says

Wyoming Sen. Michael B. Enzi, right, introduces Eric Ueland at his confirmation hearing to be under secretary of State for management in September 2017. That nomination was later withdrawn, but Ueland will be President Donald Trump’s third legislative affairs director, starting Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Eric Ueland, hand-picked by President Donald Trump to be his third legislative affairs director, has decades of experience in the D.C. “swamp” his soon-to-be boss loathes. But the former senior GOP aide will quickly learn it is the president alone who is, as one official put it Thursday, “the decider.”

Ueland has been chief of staff to former Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and a Senate Budget Committee staff director. Experts and former officials describe him as highly qualified for the tough task of being the messenger between Trump and a Congress with a Democrat-controlled House that regularly riles up the president and a Senate where Republicans lack votes to pass most major legislation.

Homeland, Judiciary Democrat asks Pelosi to form election security task force
Rep. Lou Correa cites Mueller's findings as a need for a group to help head off future attacks

Rep. Lou Correa, D-Calif., is asking Speaker Nancy Pelosi to form a select committee that would examine election security proposals. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Lou Correa is asking Speaker Nancy Pelosi to form a task force to examine proposals for combating foreign influence and ensuring U.S. electoral systems are secure, according to a letter obtained by CQ Roll Call.

The House Homeland Security and Judiciary Committee member wrote to his fellow California Democrat citing Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s findings that foreign actors compromised U.S. election security as reason such a group is needed.

Democratic lawmakers ‘astonished’ by Trump’s claim that taking foreign ‘dirt’ is routine
Mitt Romney calls it 'unthinkable' to accept information from foreign government to influence elections

President Donald Trump argued accepting intelligence on a political opponent from foreign sources, which is illegal under federal campaign finance laws, is routine by presidential candidates and congressional campaigns. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers pushed back strenuously on President Donald Trump’s claim during a television interview Wednesday that accepting “dirt” on political opponents from foreign sources is routine.

Democrats responded incredulously to Trump’s statement that he would accept intelligence on a political opponent from another country if offered, and that doing so is common practice in congressional campaigns. 

Capitol Ink | MNGA

Capitol Ink | Barr-tleby the Scrivener

Trump: ‘Something pretty dramatic’ could happen with Mexico as tariffs loom
POTUS to allies at D-Day anniversary event: ‘Our bond is unbreakable’

President Donald Trump throws a MAGA hat to the crowd during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., in May. He has been critical and upbeat about talks with Mexico that could prevent his proposed tariffs. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Thursday breathed life into Republican members’ hopes that his administration might opt against imposing tariffs on goods entering the country from Mexico. And he also took a shot at Republican lawmakers who oppose the tariffs.

Mexican government officials met Wednesday at the White House with Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other administration officials. The two sides are slated to meet again Thursday — though Pence is scheduled to travel to Virginia and Pennsylvania for D-Day anniversary and political events.

Capitol Ink | Party Trick

Clyburn walks back comments suggesting impeachment proceedings are inevitable
“I also said we must not get out in front of our committees, all in the same sentence”

House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., criticized reporters for seizing on just one aspect of his weekend remarks on impeachment. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The No. 3 House Democratic leader on Monday walked back comments he made a day earlier on CNN, when he said he believes the chamber will eventually open impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn criticized reporters for seizing on just one aspect of his interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union.”

House will vote to hold Barr in contempt over Mueller report
Judiciary panel issued contempt citation last month against attorney general for ignoring subpoena

Attorney General William Barr testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on May 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 8:38 p.m. | The House will vote June 11 to hold Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn in contempt of Congress, House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer announced Monday.

The planned floor action follows a party-line vote in the Judiciary Committee last month on a contempt citation against Barr. The panel’s action came after the attorney general ignored its subpoena for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s full, unredacted report and underlying investigatory materials.

Another ally prepares to fete Trump, but ample disputes remain
Like in Japan, Trump’s UK visit comes amid trade and security disagreements

President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May hold a joint press conference at the White House in 2017. May announced last month she will step down, but before she does, she and Trump will meet again in London. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

For the second time in as many weeks, President Donald Trump is headed overseas, where he will be feted by a foreign government despite long-standing differences on combustible issues that could overshadow the pomp and circumstance.

Trump will land in the United Kingdom on Monday morning for an official state visit that will allow him to rub elbows with the British royal family. He will also meet one-on-one with outgoing British Prime Minister Theresa May, who last week delivered a tearful announcement that she will step down on Friday.