russia-investigation

House will proceed with articles of impeachment against Trump, Pelosi says
Pelosi instructed committee chairmen to draft articles

Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces on the Speakers Balcony in the Capitol on Thursday that she is calling on the House Judiciary Committee to proceed with articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Thursday that she has asked House committee chairmen to draft articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

“Sadly, but with confidence and humility, with allegiance to our founders and a heart full of love for America, today I'm asking our chairmen to proceed with articles of impeachment,” Pelosi said.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 5
Committee leaders to meet today on next steps toward impeachment, Judiciary members prepared to work over weekend

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announces Thursday that she is calling on the House Judiciary Committee to proceed with articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Judiciary Democrats have been advised to stay in Washington this weekend for impeachment strategy sessions, but members were unclear whether they’d be huddling to prepare for a Monday hearing or to begin debating the scope of articles of impeachment.

The committee announced Thursday afternoon that it will hold a hearing at 9 a.m. Monday to receive a presentation from Intelligence Committee counsel on its impeachment inquiry report, as well as a presentation from its own counsel. Members on the panel were not clear what the Judiciary counsel would be presenting.

Washington Democratic Rep. Denny Heck not running for reelection
Heck said investigating Russian election interference and impeachment ‘have rendered my soul weary’

Rep. Denny Heck, D-Wash., is not running for reelection. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Denny Heck announced Wednesday that he is not running for reelection. The Washington Democrat, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, cited the impeachment investigation as part of the reason for his retirement.

“The countless hours I have spent in the investigation of Russian election interference and the impeachment inquiry have rendered my soul weary,” Heck wrote in a Medium post.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 4
Judiciary hearing features partisan sniping, witnesses play parts they were chosen for

Democratic Rep. Al Green of Texas, who has called for the impeachment of President Donald Trump since not long after he took office, watches the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The four constitutional experts called to testify Wednesday before the House Judiciary Committee on the impeachment into President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine largely played the roles they were asked to play at the televised hearing.

The three Democrat-called witnesses agreed Trump’s behavior warrants impeachment.

It’s Devin Nunes v. World when it comes to lawsuits
California Republican has sued parody Twitter accounts, media, others

A protester holds up a puppet of California Rep. Devin Nunes on Nov. 20 as Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, testifies before the House Intelligence Committee in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Nunes has threatened to sue media outlets that reported he met with Ukrainian officials to get help compiling a committee report when he was chairman of the Intelligence panel. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Devin Nunes has been a high-profile participant in the impeachment inquiry as ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, but since March, the California Republican has also filed six lawsuits, the most recent one reportedly against CNN. He’s also threatened to sue The Daily Beast. Here’s where the six lawsuits stand.

In March, Nunes filed a $250 million defamation suit against Twitter and two parody accounts — Devin Nunes’ Cow and Devin Nunes’ Mom — and Liz Mair, a Republican consultant, alleging that Cow and Mom accused him of being a Russian spy who was friends with racists. Twitter sought to dismiss the suit, but in October, a judge in Virginia allowed the case to go forward. Also in October, Nunes’ lawyer sent a letter to Nunes’ 2018 Democratic opponent, Andrew Janz, demanding Janz make the person behind the cow account stop. Janz’s lawyer rejected that demand.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 3
Court sides with House committees over Trump’s financial records, Trump issues threat over impeachment from NATO summit

President Donald Trump is seen during his meeting with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in London on Tuesday. NATO leaders gathered for a summit to mark the alliance's 70th anniversary. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)

House Intelligence Committee Democrats Tuesday laid out the case for impeaching President Donald Trump for withholding military aid to Ukraine in exchange for Kyiv investigating his political rival, and for obstructing the House’s probe.

The report, released Tuesday by the House Intelligence Committee, provides findings after weeks of private and public testimony from career bureaucrats and Trump appointees.

Consequential month ahead for court battles between House and Trump
Decisions expected in several cases that could determine limits of congressional power to investigate the president

The U.S. Supreme Court building at sunset on Nov. 14. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

December will bring a blizzard of action in federal courts that could ultimately settle the limits of congressional power to investigate presidents and compel testimony — and could play a role in the ongoing political drama over impeachment.

In the next two weeks, the Supreme Court and others will handle litigation about congressional subpoenas for White House and national security officials and about lawmakers’ ability to get documents related to President Donald Trump’s finances.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 2
White House won’t participate in Judiciary impeachment hearing; ranking member Collins wants minority to select experts

Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., will convene his committee to hear from constitutional experts on the legality of the impeachment inquiry. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans on the Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs panels released a 123-page staff report Monday panning the Democrats’ impeachment inquiry as “an orchestrated campaign to upend our political system.”

The GOP members said evidence presented during the fact-finding stage of Democrats’ impeachment inquiry “does not prove” Democrats’ allegations that President Donald Trump abused his authority to pressure Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden to benefit his 2020 election by leveraging a White House meeting and the release of U.S. security assistance.

Photos of the Week
The week of Nov. 22 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Workers hoist one of three holiday wreaths into place on the front facade of Union Station on Tuesday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A marathon of impeachment hearings dominated the week, but we also saw former Speaker John Boehner return to the Capitol for the unveiling of his portrait before Congress left town for the Thanksgiving recess.

In wild Fox News interview, Trump again shows his obsession with 2016 election
President repeats false assertion about ‘Steele dossier,’ says impeachment is backfiring on Democrats

Then-Democratic presidential nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton debates then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in 2016 in Las Vegas. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS — For Donald Trump, it may always be 2016.

The president is running for reelection in 2020, but a wild Friday morning television interview showed anew just how laser-focused he remains on things that happened — and that he and right-wing lawmakers and commentators claim went down — three years ago.