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Republican players are low, but camaraderie is high ahead of Congressional Softball Game
Lawmakers and press corps unite to fight against breast cancer

Florida Democratic Rep. Kathy Castor waits for her pitch at last year’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game. This year’s game is scheduled for June 19. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The official list of players in this year’s Congressional Women’s Softball Game is OUT! (to be read in an umpire’s voice) and we have just over a month before members of Congress and the D.C. press corps face each other on the field again.

The members team, which is historically composed of a bipartisan bunch of female lawmakers, has seen a decreasing number of Republican players over the years, one of them being last year’s MVP, former Rep. Mia Love. This year Sens. Joni Ernst and Shelley Moore Capito, Res. Cmmsr. Jenniffer González-Colón and Rep. Martha Roby make up less than a third of the team.

Kyrsten Sinema and Mike Gallagher are still the fastest members of Congress
Arizona senator and Wisconsin rep repeat in ACLI Capital Challenge

Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Wisconsin GOP Rep. Mike Gallagher were the fastest members of Congress in Wednesday’s ACLI Capital Challenge. (Kathryn Lyons/CQ Roll Call)

The chill in this morning’s air wasn’t enough to give runners cold feet at the annual ACLI Capital Challenge.

The race, in its 38th year, pits members of Congress, high-ranking political appointees and judges, and members of the media against each other in a 3-mile race to see who’s the fastest — and fittest — in D.C.

Stoney’s turns up as former Hill staffer Luke Stone makes ‘Bachelorette’ debut
Stone, who was once a staff assistant for Rep. Brad Sherman, overcomes cringeworthy first impression

Former Hill staffer Luke Stone’s “Bachelorette” appearance stopped some Stoney’s patrons in mid-bite. (Kathryn Lyons/CQ Roll Call)

D.C.’s own Luke Stone cleaned up last night on “The Bachelorette” and scored himself another shot on his quest for Hannah B’s love.

As you can see from “chicken wing guy” in the above photo, he had viewers uncertain of his fate up until about the last 10 minutes of the season premiere.

Your Hill horoscope: Big artsy guns and $10 wristbands
What’s happening around D.C. this week

Tulips are pictured on the West Front of the Capitol last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We heard it through the grapevine that National Theatre is putting on “Pride & Joy,” a musical based on the marriage of D.C. legend Marvin Gaye and his wife Anna. The play runs this week through May 12. Tickets range from $49 to $99.

R&B great Ginuwine is playing City Winery in Ivy City on Wednesday. The crooner, best known for his sex jam “Pony,” is probably responsible for a slight baby boom in the late-’90s and early-2000s. Tickets start at $60, and doors open at 6 p.m.

Congressional fight over DC weed legalization could get sticky
District allows possession of small amounts of marijuana, but wants ability to tax sales

A U.S. flag redesigned with marijuana leaves flies over a protest in front of the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Mayor Muriel Bowser’s proposal to fully legalize marijuana in the District of Columbia could set up another clash with Congress over cannabis laws, so maybe don’t go investing in Flamin’ Hot Cheetos or Cap’n Crunch cereal just yet.

Before the District goes up in smoke, Congress, which has jurisdiction over how D.C. executes its laws, could decide the fate of Bowser’s Safe Cannabis Sales Act of 2019.

Meet Roll Call’s new Heard on the Hill reporters

Clyde McGrady and Kathryn Lyons of CQ Roll Call are photographed in Russell Building on Friday, April 5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Clyde McGrady and Kathryn Lyons introduce you to the personalities behind the policy and politics on Capitol Hill

Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar, foreign policy giant, dies
Lugar sat for decades on the Senate Relations Committee, which he led twice as chairman

Former Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., seen here attending a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony for former Sen. Bob Dole in January 2018, died Sunday at age 87. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar, a Republican foreign policy leader, died Sunday. He was 87.

Lugar’s career focused on foreign policy and national security issues, including efforts to secure and dismantle nuclear arsenals of former Soviet states following the Cold War.

History in the making for White House Correspondents Dinner
There were still burns at this year’s press and politics event, but the heat wasn’t as severe

White House Correspondents Association Olivier Knox, far right, talks with historian and biographer Ron Chernow, to his right, Saturday at the association’s annual dinner in Washington, D.C. (Paul Morigi/Getty Images)

You might have noticed a few things missing from Saturday night’s White House Correspondents Association Dinner, and if you were there, you could feel it.

The annual gala was void of the highly anticipated Hollywood A-listers seen in the Bush and Obama years, safe from controversial dinner entertainment, free from Trump and his staff, and consequently, rid of edginess.

No Trump, no gluten, no problem at White House Correspondents’ Dinner
You say tomato, we say EpiPen: Celebrated chef preps for all eventualities ahead of nerd prom

Washington Hilton Executive Chef Andre Cote prepares for the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. (Nathan OuelletteCQ Roll Call)

Gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan — these are just some of the restrictions Washington Hilton executive chef Andre Cote has to plan for ahead of the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner. Ever heard of a nightshade allergy? Chef Andre has, and so have the countless tomatoes, eggplants, peppers and potatoes that have gone un-enjoyed thanks to someone’s sensitivity.

The aversion is unfortunate news for the 6,000 red and yellow pear tomatoes ordered ahead of this year’s dinner, but luckily, the team in place at the Washington Hilton has already taken your allergies and intolerances into consideration long before you have the chance to send back your plate.

It’s called accountability, but only for some
When mom told you life was unfair, she was right. But is that right?

Dismissing the importance of American election security, as Jared Kushner recently did, is just fine, as long as you do it with confidence in New York in front of a bunch of important people at a TIME summit, Curtis writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — When I was a little girl growing up in West Baltimore, my parents (especially my mom) gave me some truth along with the love. “You will have to work twice as hard to get half as far,” they told their working-class African American child, schooled as they had been in life’s challenges. They also warned about what everyone on my side of town knew: There was little to no room for error because folks like us seldom got the benefit of the doubt.

This was not to discourage me — far from it. It was to prepare me. Better to know what the deal was upfront.