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Jones Bested Moore in Alabama In-State Fundraising Under National Spotlight
But both received majority of large-dollar donations from outside Alabama

Democratic candidate for Senate Doug Jones, center, accompanied by Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., right, and Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., left, waves to supporters as he arrives for a canvass kick-off rally at his campaign field office in Birmingham, Ala., on Sunday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Doug Jones, the Democratic candidate for Alabama’s Senate seat, received almost a quarter of his $3.2 million itemized donations from within the state between Oct. 1 and Nov. 22, according to records newly released by the Federal Election Commission.

That’s more than his opponent, Republican Roy Moore, who netted 20 percent of his $861,000 itemized contributions from within the state during the same period of time. 

Democrats Won’t Support Another Stopgap, Hoyer Says
... Even if it’s clean

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats will not support another clean continuing resolution that would allow Republicans to continue shirking their governing responsibilities, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer said Tuesday.

Hoyer named several “must pass” bills Republicans have yet to get through Congress, including reauthorizations of the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and the National Flood Insurance program, as well as the next disaster supplemental and legislation providing a path to legal status for young undocumented immigrants impacted by the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

With Tax Deal in the Works, Questions Turn to Timing
Deal could be announced as soon as today, with votes next week

Capitol Hill was relatively calm Tuesday morning, as Washington braced for the results of the Alabama Senate election and timing on a vote on tax overhaul and spending is in flux.. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Hill was relatively calm on Tuesday morning, even as timing on two big ticket items — voting on a tax overhaul package and what to do about year-end spending questions — hung in the air unresolved and the nation was fixated on Alabama’s special Senate election, where voting is under way.

House Republicans meeting as a conference over at the Republican National Committee headquarters said there was no specific timeline for voting on the tax package, as the formal conference committee is set to meet, perhaps for the only time, on Wednesday.

Dogged By Sexual Misconduct Claims, Farenthold Slogs Ahead in Texas
Texas GOP delegation remains tight-lipped about support of congressman’s fifth-term bid

Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, has carried on his re-election campaign amid a sexual misconduct controversy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Blake Farenthold signaled Monday he intends to slog ahead with his re-election campaign against the storm of sexual misconduct claims against him, the Texas Tribune reported.

The fourth-term Lone Star State Republican, 56, will face a crowded GOP primary to keep his 27th District seat, with five challengers declaring they’ll take him on.

Transgender Woman Said Lujan Grisham’s Office Discriminated Against Her
Says she was fired from her internship when it was learned she was transgender

A former intern said Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., fired her for being transgender. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A former intern said she was fired from New Mexico Democratic Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s office for being transgender.

Riley Del Rey told the Santa Fe New Mexican she was fired from the Democrat’s office almost three years ago and is speaking now because she has seen a number of stories about sexual harassment but transgender voices are missing.

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing Around the Capitol
Pups on parade, Scalise on next year’s Congressional Baseball Game starting lineup, and more holiday parties

Carter Reardon, 5, of Fredericksburg, Virginia, checks out the U.S. Botanic Garden's annual model train exhibit which features roadside attractions from around the nation including Rhode Island's Mr. Potato Head on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. And some of the best ones are those that we come across while reporting the big ones.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Trump Says Gillibrand ‘Would Do Anything’ For Campaign Donations
Gillibrand fires back: ‘You cannot silence me’

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing the White House last week. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Updated at 9:45 a.m. | President Donald Trump on Tuesday alleged that Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand “would do anything” for his campaign contributions before he ran for president. 

In a morning tweet, the president dubbed the New York Democrat a “lightweight” and dubbed her “disloyal” to the Clintons, whom he tweeted “USED!” her.

Corrine Brown Petitions to Stay Out of Prison During Appeal
Former congresswoman sentenced earlier this month to five years on fraud conviction

Former U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown walks out of the federal courthouse in Jacksonville, Florida, last week after being sentenced to five years in prison on fraud and conspiracy charges. (Bob Mack/Florida Times-Union via AP)

Former Florida Rep. Corrine Brown is seeking to stay out of prison while she appeals her convictions on fraud and conspiracy charges.

The disgraced Florida Democrat was sentenced to five years in prison earlier this month and was given until Jan. 8 to surrender to the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

The Alabama Senate Race: A Religious Experience
Both campaigns tap into religious networks to turn out voters

Alabama Democrat Doug Jones speaks, flanked, from left, by Selma Mayor Darrio Melton, former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Alabama Rep. Terri A. Sewell, outside the Brown Chapel AME Church in Selma, Ala. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

GALLANT, Ala. — At Roy Moore’s home church here on Sunday, there wasn’t much talk of the upcoming Senate election — even though throngs of cameras waited outside to catch a glimpse of the elusive Republican candidate.

After the Sunday service began at Gallant First Baptist Church, Rev. Tom Brown offered a prayer.

How Moore Would Change the Senate From Day One
From collegial courtesy to the page program, Hill culture would be rattled

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore and his wife Kayla leave Moore's "Drain the Swamp" rally in Midland City, Ala., on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The nature of the Senate would be challenged right away, and in several tangible ways, with the election of Roy Moore.

Even though Congress is now defined by its tribal partisanship, which long ago gave the lie to whatever senatorial claim remained to being “the world’s greatest deliberative body,” Tuesday’s special election in Alabama threatens to make life in the northern half of Capitol Hill an even more unpleasant experience. Traditions and courtesies that have applied a bit of congenial gloss to the coarseness of the place would soon enough become endangered by Moore’s very presence.