Amy Klobuchar

Florida’s Midterms Loom Large in ‘March for Our Lives’
Feb. 14 school mass shooting pushes gun violence to forefront in campaigns

Catherine Monroe, 19, who drove all night from Gainesville, Fla., rests near the Capitol Reflecting Pool before joining the student-led March for Our Lives rally on Pennsylvania Avenue on Saturday to call for action to prevent gun violence. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Todd Foote came to Saturday’s “March for Our Lives” in Washington because of his son Austin.

Austin is a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, where a gunman killed 17 people last month. Scott Beigel, his cross-country coach, was among the victims. So were four of his friends. His best friend’s sister was in the hospital for two weeks.

No Clear Path to Legislation for Lawmakers Expressing Outrage Over Facebook Revelations
Congress has historically taken a hands-off approach to tech oversight

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO and founder of Facebook, has not indicated whether he will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Lawmakers, motivated by revelations of Facebook Inc.’s handling of users’ data, may take a look at proposals for new data safeguards — but it’s far from clear that Congress has a clear path from lawmakers’ anger over Facebook to legislative action.

Disclosures about Facebook’s relationship with Cambridge Analytica, and the latter’s behavior in the 2016 elections, may have given legislation greater urgency than was the case after companies such as Equifax Inc. lost the data of about 145 million consumers. But legislation doesn’t seem imminent and, to the extent it’s about data protection, may miss the mark.

Senate Pushes Anti-Sex Trafficking Deal Ahead
Passage assured this week despite concerns from some internet businesses

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, left, is concerned that a measure championed by Ohio Sen. Rob Portman to combat sex trafficking could have unintended consequences and make it more difficult to pursue traffickers. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers championing a bipartisan bill to make it easier to go after sex trafficking on the internet are on the verge of victory.

In the Senate, it’s a large coalition that’s been led by Republican Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio and Connecticut Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal.

Five Cabinet Secretaries Face Senate Barrage
Questions range from infrastructure to nuclear waste to the Census

Senate Commerce Chairman John Thune's panel hosted five Cabinet secretaries on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s not every day — or even every decade — that five cabinet secretaries walk in to testify at the same Senate hearing.

And while Wednesday’s Commerce, Science and Transportation hearing generally focused on President Donald Trump’s proposal to rebuild American infrastructure (and doubts about how to pay for it), senators took full advantage of having so many heavy hitters in one room.

Former Bush Lawyer and Trump Critic Exploring Minnesota Senate Run
Richard Painter says he’s not sure if he will run as a Democrat, Republican or independent

Richard Painter served in the George W. Bush administration as White House ethics lawyer and teaches law at the University of Minnesota. (Dartmouth College Ethics Institute)

Former Bush administration ethics lawyer Richard Painter is considering a run for Senate in Minnesota against Sen. Tina Smith.

Painter said at a news conference in front of the state Capitol that he was forming an exploratory committee to examine a run, the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported.

Opinion: The Quatorze Quotient — The Importance of 14 Years in Big-Time Politics
If would-be presidents haven’t made their mark by then, they could be seen as shopworn

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., is among the politicians for whom the “14-Year Rule” for presidential prospects may apply , Walter Shapiro writes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For those trying to get a jump on handicapping the 2032 presidential race (and, frankly, who isn’t?), a smart move would be to take a close look at the candidates who will be elected for the first time to Congress (or as governor) this November.

It all comes down to political numerology and the lasting importance of a 14-year gap.

Republicans Irate, Democrats Press After Trump Gun Control Meeting
GOP members rebuke president for putting gun control over due process

President Donald Trump met with a bipartisan group of lawmakers on Wednesday to discuss gun control measures in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

As Republican leaders scrambled to address the apparent disconnect between themselves and President Donald Trump on gun control legislation at a bipartisan meeting of lawmakers on Wednesday, Democrats pressured the president to keep his word.

“We’re not ditching any Constitutional protections simply because the last person the President talked to today doesn’t like them,” GOP Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska said in a statement Wednesday.

Senators Target Physicians, Drugmakers in Opioid Bill
Bipartisan group hopes to make headway on drug crisis

Sens. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., right, and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., were among the senators introducing legislation to address the opioid crisis. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of senators on Tuesday introduced legislation that would waive limits on physicians treating addiction patients and place restrictions on how long a provider could initially prescribe opioids to patients.

The bill, known as CARA 2.0, would address the opioid epidemic from several angles, including both health care providers and drugmakers. It aims to build on earlier opioid legislation, which cleared in 2016 as part of a broader health care measure that included mental health changes and aimed to spur new medical treatments.

Klobuchar Open to Fining Social Media for ‘Bots’
‘I think that would be a great idea,’ Minnesota Democrat says

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., signaled she would consider a potential bill fining social media companies for failing to wipe "bots" from their platforms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As federal investigators continue to find evidence that Russian nationals interfered in the 2016 U.S. elections, lawmakers have struggled to find ways to combat any repeat efforts in 2018.

One potential solution? Fining social media titans like Facebook and Twitter— where Russians pose as people and groups within the U.S. to promote certain political views and events — whenever they fail to deactivate “bots” on their platforms.

Democratic Leaders Request FBI Funding to Stop Russian Influence in Midterms
Also call for release of public report

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, right, and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer make their way to the Senate floor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Key Democratic lawmakers urged Republican leadership Wednesday to include additional FBI funding in the fiscal 2018 spending bill to combat possible Russian interference in the upcoming midterm elections.

The request comes after the Justice Department charged 13 Russian nationals and three Russian companies Friday over alleged attempts to interfere with the 2016 presidential election.