David Young

House Seats You Think Can’t Flip but Might
Political wave elections create their own race dynamics

Rep. Sue W. Kelly lost her re-election bid in 2006 even though she appeared safe, having won two years earlier with 67 percent of the vote in a New York district carried by President George W. Bush. The result is a reminder that wave elections produce their own dynamics. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Responses to the “generic ballot” poll question suggest a partisan electoral wave is building. But the fight for control of the House isn’t a single national election. It will be fought district by district, and national Democrats face challenges on the ground even with the generic ballot favoring them.

In Michigan, according to America Votes 2007-2008, the statewide congressional vote shifted noticeably from 2004 to 2006 — from 49 percent Republican and 48 percent Democratic to 53 percent Democratic and 44 percent Republican — but that popular vote surge for the Democrats didn’t translate to a shift of even a single House seat.

Does Iowa Still Matter to Democrats?
Democrats in Iowa and other rural states worry the national party will abandon them

Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton speaks during the Polk County Democrats’ Steak Fry in Des Moines, Iowa, on Sept. 30. (Charlie Neibergal/AP file photo)

DES MOINES, Iowa — As Democrats try to find a way to win back the White House and control of Congress, party members in Iowa and other rural states are worried about being abandoned by the national party.

Iowa Democratic Party Chairman Troy Price was in Las Vegas last week for the Democratic National Committee’s fall meeting and said Democrats cannot take Midwestern states like Iowa for granted.

In Iowa, Heartland Democrats Ask ‘What About the Economy, Stupid?’
But candidates are divided on how populist their messages need to be

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan talks with Heather Ryan (no relation), a Democratic candidate in Iowa’s 3rd District, during a steak fry in Des Moines on Sept. 30. (Charlie Neibergall/AP File Photo)

DES MOINES, Iowa — Democrats in the Midwest know that the way to win back voters in states like Iowa is to talk about the economy, but they’re debating how exactly to do it.

As a state that can make or break presidential campaignsand one that had regularly sent liberal Democrats to Washington, Iowa now serves as a test of whether Democrats can win back white voters who have swung toward the Republican Party over the last decade.

Democratic Young Guns Take Different Approach to Rebuilding Party
In trip to early voting Iowa, Bustos rebuilds from the bottom, while Ryan and Moulton want to topple the top

Democratic Reps. Cheri Bustos of Illinois, center, and Seth Moulton of Massachusetts, left, get instructions before working the grill during the Polk County Democrats Steak Fry in Des Moines on Sept. 30. (Charlie Neibergall/AP)

DES MOINES, Iowa — Before the Polk County Democratic Party’s steak fry, Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos was trying to give potential candidates the secret sauce for Democrats to win in rural areas.

GOP Super PAC Expands Field Presence to 17 Districts
Congressional Leadership Fund opens offices in six more districts

Congressional Leadership Fund is opening a field office in New Jersey Rep. Leonard Lance’s district. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Republican super PAC backed by House leadership is expanding its field program by opening new offices in six GOP-held districts. 

Congressional Leadership Fund now has a 17 field offices across the country.

How GOP Outside Spending Turned a Loser Into a Winner in Montana
Congressional Leadership Fund spent $2.7 million to boost Greg Gianforte

Greg Gianforte won the special election for Montana’s at-large House seat Thursday despite attacking a reporter the night before. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Six months ago, Republican Greg Gianforte lost Montana’s gubernatorial election by nearly 4 points. Thursday night, he won statewide by about 6 points.

Congressional special elections are, well, special. The electorate is different, and so is the spending. Last fall, Gianforte was running against an incumbent.

Young’s Constituent Wins Congressional Art Competition Twice in a Row
Iowa Republican picks the same high school student to show her work in the Capitol

Rep. David Young, R-Iowa, surprised the student Kallan Paulsen (right) with the news of her win. (Courtesy Young's office)

Iowa Republican David Young chose the same high school student, Kallan Paulsen, to have her work hung in the annual Congressional Art Competition.

Young surprised Kallan last week with the announcement that she was a two-time winner.

Word on the Hill: Seen on the Hill
Ben Franklin in plastic

Swan Lake at the Reflecting Pool? (Courtesy anonymous Heard on the Hill reader)

It’s been a busy week, but it appears the ducks who live on the Capitol grounds haven’t yet gotten the memo.

Two ducks were either practicing “synchronized duck diving” or “bipartisan water ballet,” in the Capitol Reflecting Pool on Monday, a Heard on the Hill reader said.

24 House Republicans Face Attacks Over Health Care Vote
Liberal advocacy group targets Republicans in TV and digital ads

The liberal advocacy group Save My Care is attacking Arizona Rep. Martha McSally for her vote for the GOP health care plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Twenty-four GOP members of Congress home on recess this week will be greeted by a new six-figure ad campaign attacking them for their vote in the House last week for the Republican health care plan. 

The liberal health care advocacy group Save My Care is launching a TV and digital advertising campaign worth more than half a million dollars on Monday that will run this week. 

House GOP Optimistic Ahead of Health Care Vote
‘There were a lot of smiles in the room today’

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday before the House plans to vote on the heath care bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)


House Republicans started celebrating early Thursday, ahead of their vote to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.