deficit

Capitol Ink | Magic Feather

Ep. 4: How Obamacare Could Lead Republicans to a Fiscal Train Wreck
Budget Tracker Extra

Various fiscal issues are piling up for Congress but remain unresolved, largely due to the GOP’s inability to agree on a roadmap to repealing Obamacare, says CQ Roll Call’s senior budget reporter Paul Krawzak. He explains how the Trump administration is approaching its first budget, but cautions that the end result might even be no budget at all.

Show Notes:

Republicans Could Face Trouble Balancing Next Budget
The GOP has a formidable challenge in trying to write a fiscal 2018 resolution that balances in a decade

Republican Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, left, and Mike Lee of Utah want to eliminate the deficit within 10 years.(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Mixed Bag of Republicans Vote Against Obamacare Repeal Vehicle
GOP defectors cite deficit, lack of replacement

Dent voted against the budget resolution because of concerns about the GOP rushing to repeal Obamacare without a replacement plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans on Friday passed a bare-bones fiscal 2017 budget resolution with few intraparty defections, as most GOP members saw the unbalanced and long-delayed spending plan as a necessary means to an end of repealing the 2010 health care law.

The nine Republicans who voted against the measure raised concerns about either the budget not balancing, a key priority for fiscal conservatives, or the aggressive timeline of repealing the Affordable Care Act, given that the GOP has yet to present a replacement plan. The final vote was 227-198. 

Debt Ceiling Deadline Falls in Trump’s First 100 Days but Fix May Not
Conservatives prepping deficit reduction plans to pair with any increase

Arizona Rep. David Schweikert is working on deficit reduction proposals that members say could be paired with an increase in the debt ceiling. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Republicans about to have unified control of the government ready their 100-day agenda, one thing is notably missing: a plan for addressing the government’s borrowing authority when the current debt limit suspension expires on March 15.

Congress suspended the debt ceiling as part of a budget deal former Speaker John A. Boehner negotiated before leaving office in the fall of 2015. When the suspension lifts, the cap will need to be raised or suspended again for the United States to avoid default.