Delaware

Could Trump’s acquittal spell the end of White Houses honoring congressional subpoenas?
Some Senate Democrats are concerned it could set a new precedent

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and the other Supreme Court justices may ultimately have to decide about the validity of congressional subpoenas. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Congress may have issued its last successful subpoenas to a president of the opposite party, some senators worry, now that President Donald Trump is acquitted of the House’s obstruction of Congress charge.

The argument is that the 47-53 vote Wednesday to reject the second article of impeachment lessened the legislative branch’s power to oversee the executive branch and complicates ongoing litigation on the power of a congressional subpoena. 

Iowa lawmakers band together with early caucus spot on the line
Democratic chaos raises new questions about whether the state should be first in presidential contest

Iowa voters wait for the start of a Democratic satellite caucus at the IBEW headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Monday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

With Iowa’s “first in the nation” status on the line after chaotic Democratic caucuses rocked the presidential primary, Iowa lawmakers in both parties banded together Tuesday to defend their state’s role in the process. 

It took until early Tuesday evening for the Iowa Democratic Party to announce results from Monday’s caucuses. And even then it was less than two-thirds of the tallies because of uncertainty and confusion around a new app used for reporting voter preferences as well as the calculations for allocating delegates.

View from the gallery: Senators pack up desks as impeachment trial nears its end
Chamber takes on a last-day-of-school vibe

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., leaves the Capitol after the conclusion of the Senate impeachment trial proceedings on Feb. 3. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer tightly hugged Rep. Adam B. Schiff just after the closing argument in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, and spoke directly into the House lead manager’s ear for about 10 seconds.

Before the New York senator let go, he gave Schiff three loud pats on the back, as a line of other Senate Democrats waited to hug the California Democrat or shake his hand.

View from the gallery: Restless senators eager to flee impeachment court for weekend
Chief justice silences senators for the first time in the trial

From left, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., leave the Senate Republicans’ caucus meeting in the Capitol during a recess in the Senate impeachment trial proceedings on Friday evening. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Arkansas Republican Tom Cotton accidentally voted the wrong way on a procedural vote late Friday during President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, so when he got the next vote right he turned to his colleagues and took a dramatic bow.

Georgia Republican David Perdue missed his queue to vote twice because he was chatting with Texas Republican Ted Cruz, who offered to take the blame.

View from the gallery: Senators swap notes and jockey for questions at Trump trial
Aides hold office hours in the back of the chamber while Senate pages log their steps for the day

Alan Dershowitz, left, an attorney for President Donald Trump, greets Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., in the Capitol before the continuation of the impeachment trial Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Mississippi Republican Roger Wicker approached a member of President Donald Trump’s legal team on the floor Wednesday and loudly asked: “You’re not packing up to leave, are you?”

Former Harvard University law professor Alan Dershowitz had gathered a small crowd of Republican senators around the desk of Mike Lee of Utah during the dinner break, and Wicker wanted to elbow in when the impeachment trial restarted.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 29
House Foreign Affairs Chairman Engel says Bolton advised him to look into ambassador’s ouster

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks to the Senate floor before the start of the Senate impeachment trial proceedings Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 7:30 p.m.

Sen. Chris Van Hollen announced plans to introduce a motion to require the chief justice to subpoena documents and witnesses if he determines they are relevant to the impeachment articles, and to exercise his authority to rule on evidence issues like executive privilege.

Trump trial enters the question-and-answer phase
Senators on both sides draft questions aimed at bolstering their cases for or against conviction

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer tells reporters to ask questions one at a time at a news conference during a break in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Jan. 27. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Senators will finally get to actually participate — at least by proxy — in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Wednesday after long days and nights of just listening to presentations from House impeachment managers and the president’s own attorneys.

The Senate will spend up to eight hours each on Wednesday and Thursday on written questions submitted by senators and read aloud by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., alternating the questioning between the minority and majority. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that during the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton, senators were “thoughtful and brief in their questions” and that House managers and the president's counsel were “succinct in their answers.”

Democrats fight for Elijah Cummings’ legacy — and a seat in Congress
Support from black women will be key in next Tuesday’s special election primary

Maryland Democrat Maya Rockeymoore Cummings greets worshippers Sunday before a service at the Zion Baptist Church in Baltimore. She is running in a crowded Democratic primary to succeed her late husband, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, in the 7th District. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BALTIMORE — Two dozen Democrats are running for the nomination in Maryland’s 7th District, but no one looms larger over the race than the late Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, whose death last fall prompted the upcoming special election.

What Cummings wanted in a successor — and what people think he would have wanted — have become big factors in this contest, where the two best-known candidates are his widow, Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, and his friend and predecessor, Kweisi Mfume, who left Congress in 1996 to lead the NAACP.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 28
GOP senators met Tuesday to gather input on whether to call witnesses

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham speaks with reporters before the start of the Senate impeachment trial proceedings Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

File updated 5:30 p.m.

The president’s defense team has completed its presentation.

View from the gallery: Senators suffer through sniffles and sleepiness at Trump trial
House managers wrap up their presentation before an increasingly restless Senate

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham is surrounded by reporters Friday as he arrives for the Senate Republicans’ lunch before the start of the day’s impeachment trial proceedings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham, one of the president’s fiercest defenders in the Senate, chuckled, bowed his head slightly and rubbed his left eyebrow.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and California Sen. Dianne Feinstein laughed and met the eyes of their knowing Democratic colleagues.