Dina Titus

Bump Stocks Get First Hearing in Senate, Dealt Another Blow in House
ATF has begun process to re-evaluate bump stock classification, lawmakers told

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, held a hearing Wednesday that addressed bump stocks, making good on a promise after the Las Vegas shooting. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

More than two months after the Las Vegas shooting, the deadliest in U.S. history, the Senate Judiciary committee held a long-awaited hearing addressing the bump stock devices the shooter used to kill more than 50 people and injure hundreds more.

“ATF’s authority to regulate firearms is of course limited by the terms of [the 1934 and 1968 firearms laws], and they do not empower ATF to regulate parts or accessories designed to be used with firearms,” Thomas E. Brandon, the acting director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), told lawmakers.

Ruben Kihuen: ‘I’m Not Resigning’
Kihuen is facing calls to resign after sexual harassment allegations

Rep. Ruben Kihuen is facing allegations of sexual harassment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Nevada Democratic Rep. Ruben Kihuentold ABC News Tuesday that he is not resigning amid allegations of sexual harassment. Top Democrats have called on him to step down.

“I’m not resigning,” Kihuen said in an ABC news video. “I plan on continuing the job that I was elected to do by the people of the 4th Congressional District.”

Congress’ Gun Massacre Caucus
Dealing with mass shootings is becoming all too familiar for many members

South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, center left, with Rep. Mark Sanford to his right and then-Gov. Nikki Haley, second from right, attend a memorial service commemorating the anniversary of the 2015 mass shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images file photo)

On Dec. 14, 2012, Elizabeth Esty was attending a social media workshop for new members of Congress at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. She had been elected to represent Connecticut’s 5th District a month earlier.

“I raised my hand and I said, ‘Here’s an example right now — I’m getting texts and alerts that there’s been a shooting and we don’t know what happened,’” she said.

Las Vegas Massacre Survivors Join Nevada Lawmakers to Call for Action
Titus, Cortez Masto, Kihuen and Rosen want Goodlatte to hold hearings on bump stocks, pass restrictions

Las Vegas massacre survivors Robert Gaafar, left, and Tia Christiansen, center, speak with Rep. Jacky Rosen, D-Nev., after a news conference at the Capitol on Wednesday to call on House Judiciary chairman Bob Goodlatte to hold a hearing and examine the use and legality of “bump stocks.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Nevada Democratic lawmakers gathered at the House Triangle Wednesday with survivors of the Las Vegas massacre, who shared their stories of terror and the psychological impact.

The news conference took place on the one-month anniversary of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

Bipartisan Group Introduces Last-Ditch Bump Stock Bill
Bill would not ban the device, but subject it to an ATF registry

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., and three other lawmakers introduced a bipartisan bill Tuesday aimed at regulating bump stocks. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One month after the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, a bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced legislation that takes aim at the bump stock loophole in the National Firearms Act.

The so-called Closing the Bump Stock Loophole Act explicitly empowers the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to immediately regulate bump stocks and similar semiautomatic rifle attachments that increase the rate of fire to nearly that of an automatic weapon.

As GOP Passes Buck on Bump Stocks, ATF Pushes Back
Momentum to regulate the devices used in the Las Vegas massacre has stalled

Antoinette Cannon, who worked as a trauma nurse and treated victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, leaves a rose at each of the 58 white crosses at a makeshift memorial on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip earlier this month. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Efforts to ban bump stocks have come to a screeching halt, with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives once again indicating it does not have the authority to reclassify and regulate the devices.

The ATF wrote letters in 2010 and 2013 explaining how current laws — the Gun Control Act (1968) and National Firearms Act (1934) — do not provide an avenue for the bureau to regulate the gun attachments, which enable shooters to fire semiautomatic weapons at nearly the rate of automatic ones.

Curbelo, Moulton Introduce Bipartisan Bump Stock Legislation
Twenty House members, 10 Democratic and 10 GOP, are co-sponsors

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Nass., left, and Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., introduced bipartisan legislation Tuesday to ban bump stock rifle attachments. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Reps. Carlos Curbelo and Seth Moulton introduced bipartisan legislation Tuesday to ban devices — including bump stocks — that “increase the rate of fire of a semiautomatic rifle.”

The bill aims to ban the manufacture, sale, and possession of bump stocks, attachments that can increase the rate of fire of a semiautomatic rifle tenfold — essentially making them fully automatic.

Uncertain Costs for Renewed Nuclear Waste Push in Nevada
The controversial Yucca Mountain plan would spur a $260 million spending increase, but the math is muddled

Nevada lawmakers — from left, Reps. Dina Titus, Dean Heller, Ruben Kihuen, and Jacky Rosen — confer in April after making statements in opposition to using Yucca Mountain as a nuclear waste disposal site. On Friday, Titus said a CBO report on the latest Yucca bill was “seriously flawed.” (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

A House bill to restart the process of making Nevada’s Yucca Mountain a permanent repository for nuclear waste would increase spending by $260 million over the next 10 years, the Congressional Budget Office said Friday in a report that acknowledges some uncertain numbers.

The CBO’s score could be a hurdle for the Yucca bill by forcing its backers to offset the cost by cutting other federal spending under pay-as-you-go budget mandates. The bill moved out of the Energy and Commerce Committee with surprisingly bipartisan support considering how the issue had divided Capitol Hill while Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada was majority leader. Reid didn’t seek reelection in 2016.

Las Vegas Shooting Reignites Gun Debate on Capitol Hill
Members offer prayers and condolences to victims and families, tributes to police and first responders

People scramble for shelter at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after a gunman opened fire, leaving at least 50 people dead and more than 2oo wounded. (David Becker/Getty Images)

Democratic lawmakers on Monday morning renewed their pleas for legislative action to restrict access to firearms after a gunman unleashed a storm of bullets on concertgoers on the Las Vegas Strip late Sunday night.

At least 58 people were killed, officials said. Multiple media outlets have reported that more than 500 people were taken to local hospitals for treatment in what is the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

Titus Passes on Nevada Senate Race
Titus had considered challenging Sen. Dean Heller

Nevada Democratic Rep. Dina Titus had considered running for Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Nevada Democratic Rep. Dina Titus has decided not to challenge GOP Sen. Dean Heller next year, lowering the likelihood of a Democratic primary for the Senate race.

“After careful consideration I have decided that I can better serve the people of Nevada as dean of the House delegation than as a freshman senator, so I will be running for re-election in District 1,” Titus said in a statement to the CBS affiliate in Las Vegas