Don Beyer Jr

Pence: Give Police, Families Tools for Mentally Disturbed
VP vows massive job creation via beefed-up space program

Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr., D-Va., speaks with D.C.-area students and supporters as they hold a protest against gun violence with a lie-in outside of the White House on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration intends to give law enforcement and families the “tools they need to deal with” people who have health issues that might drive them to commit violent acts like mass shootings, Vice President Mike Pence said Wednesday.

As during similar remarks late last week, however, the vice president did not specify how much that might cost or whether the administration will seek emergency funds or push Congress to include the required monies in fiscal 2018 and 2019 spending measures.

Democrats Push Bill They Say Could Have Prevented Parkland Shooting
Measure would provide states grants for passing Gun Violence Restraining Order laws

California Rep. Salud Carbajal and other House Democrats are pushing a bill in the wake of a Florida high school shooting that would reward states that create laws to allow courts to authorize temporary removal of guns when an individual poses a threat to themselves or others. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A group of House Democrats on Friday highlighted a bill they’ve authored that they say could have prevented Wednesday’s mass shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school that left 17 dead.

The bill would authorize a federal grant program for states that enact Gun Violence Restraining Order, or GVRO, laws. These statutes allow law enforcement or family members to petition courts to temporarily remove guns from a person’s possession if they pose a threat to themselves or others. If passed, a separate appropriation measure would be needed to provide the funding for the grants.

John Kelly, Democratic Lightning Rod — Again
Abuse allegations surrounding Rob Porter latest controversy

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly knew of the abuse allegations against Rob Porter but still kept Porter in a senior aide role. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly became the latest West Wing lightning rod for Democrats on Wednesday and Thursday after senior White House aide Rob Porter resigned over physical abuse and assault allegations.

Kelly was reportedly aware of the allegations against Porter as the 40-year-staff secretary struggled to gain his security clearance over the allegations.

Trump Sheds Bipartisan Tone, Returns to Blasting Dems
Presidents joins Republicans at retreat to talk DACA, infrastructure

President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in the House chamber on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It turns out the bipartisan message President Donald Trump struck in his State of the Union address had a shelf life of exactly 32 hours.

The president used part of his speech to a joint session of Congress to call on Republicans and Democrats to cooperate on issues like immigration reform and rebuilding the country’s aging infrastructure. He stuck to that script on Wednesday, taking no public shots at congressional Democrats even after they booed and hissed at parts of his address.

47 Images of the Wild Ride That Was 2017 in Congress
The year in photos as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

1. January 6: Carrying the Electoral College ballot boxes, Senate pages lead a procession through the Capitol Rotunda into the House chamber, where Congress certified the results of the 2016 presidential election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With 2017 coming to a close, Roll Call sorted through its photo archive for some of our best images of the year.

Trump Says Gillibrand ‘Would Do Anything’ for Campaign Donations
Gillibrand fires back: ‘You cannot silence me’

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing the White House last week. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Updated at 9:45 a.m. | President Donald Trump on Tuesday alleged that Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand “would do anything” for his campaign contributions before he ran for president. 

In a morning tweet, the president dubbed the New York Democrat a “lightweight” and dubbed her “disloyal” to the Clintons, whom he tweeted “USED!” her.

Trump Retweets Anti-Muslim Tweets by British Far-Right Leader
President’s unconventional messaging again obscures tax bill push

President Donald Trump arrives with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for Tuesday’s Republican Senate policy lunch in the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 8:19 a.m. | President Donald Trump continued his unconventional “tax week” messaging Wednesday morning by retweeting anti-Muslim social media posts by a far-right British political figure.

Hours before the president is slated to leave the White House for a major speech in Missouri promoting the Senate GOP tax bill — and likely targeting vulnerable Show Me State Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill over her opposition to it — the president shared a series of tweets from Jayda Fransen, the deputy leader of the Britain First movement.

Capitol Hill Figures Out What to Do With 280 Characters
Members finding creative ways to use Twitter’s expanded limit

Members of Congress are already making the most of the 140 extra characters available for tweets. (Chris Hale/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers are experimenting with new ways to communicate with the extra characters Twitter has given them.

The increased 280-character limit for tweets is already being used to post full statements, Q&As with experts or the member, more hashtags and longer lists in a single posting, instead of a series of tweets.

Word on the Hill: Happy Halloween
Send your photos to HOH

Rene T., who declined to provide his full last name, wears a “Bill on Capitol Hill” costume as he jumps in the air while a friend takes photos on the U.S. Senate steps on Halloween last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Celebrate Halloween bipawtisan style.

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., is hosting a Senate Halloween dog costume celebration, where dogs from various Senate offices will parade around in their hopefully politics-related outfits.

Politicians Lose Press Club Spelling Bee to Media Again
Rep. Ted Deutch, the last politician standing, lost to Dallas Morning News’ Todd Gillman

Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., smiles before being asked to spell "rubicund" at the National Press Club Spelling Bee on Tuesday. On the right is Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., and eventual winner Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News is at left. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

The media team won the National Press Club Spelling Bee for the second year in a row when Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News correctly spelled “somatotype.”

The annual spelling bee pits the media against members of Congress to raise money for the National Press Club Journalism Institute.