Eleanor Holmes Norton

Del. Holmes Norton ‘sees good news’ in a poll finding a majority reject D.C. statehood
Gallup found 64 percent of Americans oppose making Washington, D.C., a separate state.

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., left, and Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser. A new Gallup poll found a majority of Americans do not support D.C. statehood. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton “sees good news” in a new Gallup poll that found a majority of Americans reject D.C. statehood.

The Gallup poll, conducted in June and released Monday, found 64 percent of Americans oppose making Washington a separate state. It was released to coincide with a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Holmes Norton’s statehood bill, which has been postponed to accommodate testimony from Robert S. Mueller III.  

House Oversight Dems call on Trump to pay D.C. for Independence Day, inauguration
Cummings, Norton lead charge seeking to replenish D.C. security fund

Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., holds the gavel during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats on the House Oversight Committee are calling on President Donald Trump to commit to paying the District of Columbia back for providing public safety support for federal events in the city after Mayor Muriel Bowser said that Trump’s “Salute to America” drained it.

The House Committee on Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, of Maryland, and D.C. Democratic Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton wrote to the White House Friday asking Trump to reimburse the district’s Emergency Planning and Security Fund for his inauguration and Fourth of July celebration. Bowser has said the account is expected to not only be empty before the end of the year, but will incur overages of $6 million.

In wake of July Fourth, D.C. emergency fund depleted
Mayor Muriel Bowser asks Trump to reimburse DC for Independence Day

President Donald Trump speaks during his 'Salute to America' event as an Independence Day celebration in front of the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday July 4, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s Fourth of July celebration has contributed to the depletion of Washington, D.C.’s fund that covers the impact of the federal government’s presence on the District’s public safety needs, according to Mayor Muriel Bowser.

In Bowser’s July 9 letter to Trump, obtained by the Washington Post, she writes that the accrued amount for this year’s Independence Day festivities totals approximately $1.7 million and that she expects the Emergency Planning and Security Fund will be barren before the end of the fiscal year, leaving overages of $6 million. Bowser says that this is attributed to declining reserves, increased demand for heightened security and a $7.3 million expenditure to cover Trump’s 2017 inauguration that, in a departure from tradition, has not been reimbursed by the executive. 

The biggest question marks ahead of July Fourth ‘Salute to America’
Protests, transit closures, reimbursements, red meat and the weather loom over festivities

President Donald Trump has touted his “Salute to America” as one of the biggest gatherings in Washington, D.C. history. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the nation prepares for the July Fourth “Salute to America” on the National Mall, with a contentious appearance scheduled by President Donald Trump, there are several unanswered questions that will go a long way to determining how the whole thing unfolds.

From how extensive protests will be, to the tenor of Trump’s remarks, to how much of a damper the weather might put on things, here is a short list of what to keep an eye on. 

Democrat wants Trump to pay if ‘authoritarian-style’ July 4 event damages infrastructure
Virginia Rep. calls on the president to reach into his own pocket if D.C. streets or bridges require repairs

A visitor stands in front of temporary fencing installed along the National Mall as setup continues for President Donald Trump’s “Salute to America” event honoring service branches on Independence Day at the Lincoln Memorial on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump should pay out of his own pocket for any infrastructure damage incurred by rolling 70-ton tanks onto the National Mall, according to the Democratic congressman who represents the D.C. suburbs in Virginia.

Rep. Don Beyer described Trump’s plan to showcase tanks during the city’s Fourth of July celebration as “an authoritarian-style marshal display” in a statement Tuesday. He called on the president to reach into his own pocket if D.C. streets or bridges require repairs from having to handle the massive vehicles. 

DC to Trump: ‘Tanks but no tanks’
Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton says president is trying to turn July Fourth into ‘Bastille Day’

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-DC, said modeling the Fourth of July celebration after France's Bastille Day is "not an American way" to approach the holiday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

District of Columbia Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton forcefully pushed back on plans by President Donald Trump to include U.S. Army tanks in the Fourth of July celebration on the National Mall, saying that “can’t happen.”

Norton, along with D.C. officials, has expressed concern that the 60-ton armored vehicles could grind up the National Mall and restyle a patriotic “hometown celebration,” which attracts thousands of tourists each year and is broadcast live on national television, into a nationalistic presidential rally.

Flyovers, military bands … and tanks? Here’s what we know about the July Fourth celebrations in D.C.
Trump’s presence will be felt this year, but some details on what will happen remain murky

Spectators watch fireworks over the National Mall in Washington on July 4, 2015. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s presence will be felt at this year’s July Fourth celebrations in Washington, D.C., but some of the details on exactly what will happen and how he will participate remain murky.

Trump plans to make a speech from the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday evening — the first time a president has spoken during the festivities since 1951 — before the Capitol Fourth concert on the West Lawn and fireworks show. There will also be a flyover by the Blue Angels and Air Force One, and did someone say tanks?

Lawmakers and a lawsuit bring new life to giving D.C. a vote in Congress
The bill would make D.C. the 51st state, and it calls for the election of two senators and one House representative

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., left, and D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser announced on May 30 that the House Committee on Oversight and Reform would hold a hearing on D.C. statehood on July 24th. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers and a lawsuit with high-profile support are bringing renewed attention to something long sought by Washington, D.C., residents — a vote for the District in Congress. 

A lawsuit filed in federal district court in Washington last year offering a new legal theory for why voting rights should be granted has earned recent support from Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the League of Women Voters. 

Harrowing stories of black youth suicide moved Bonnie Watson Coleman to act
Democratic lawmaker hopes new task force can get to the bottom of the suicide crisis

“I can’t take this,” Bonnie Watson Coleman told her staffers. “Maybe I can’t fix it, but I can sure push it out as an issue.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It started with check-ins on her social media pages. Usually she hears from constituents about charged topics like taxes and health care, just as lawmakers have for years through old-fashioned mail.

But what Bonnie Watson Coleman started to see on Facebook and Twitter disturbed her: heartbreaking stories of black elementary school-age children dying of suicide.

Eleanor Holmes Norton says let them scoot!
Whether you Bird, Lyft, Skip, Spin or Jump, you can’t do it at the Capitol

Electric scooters are raising safety and security concerns on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Are you bummed about the Capitol Hill ban on electric scooters? Does your Hill commute fall within a VERY specific range in which scooting makes sense? Maybe you don’t live near a metro stop, but you’re too lazy to walk and too ashamed to call an Uber.

Well fret not Hill scooter(ers), because you have a new champion in Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, who is calling on Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund to reverse the ban.