Georgia

People Are Googling ‘When is Election Day’ — It Is November 6
Search term reached its peak on Oct. 9

A sign directs voters to the early voting location at the East Las Vegas Community Center in Las Vegas on Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, the first day of early voting in Nevada. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Election Day is Tuesday, November 6. Despite what you may have heard.

A rumor in North Carolina that independent voters are ineligible for early voting. Fliers in Florida that falsely tell voters who have already mailed in their ballots that they have “not yet returned” them.

Your Ride to the Polls Is Two Minutes Away: Lyft Helps Get Out the Vote
Critics say the company’s gesture is no match for disenfranchisement across the country

Kris Kobach is the Republican nominee for governor in Kansas. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Latino advocacy group announced Monday it will partner with Lyft to drive Kansas voters to the polls, Fortune reported.

The Latino community in Dodge City — a factory town located 160 miles from Wichita — worried about depressed turnout when local officials announced weeks before Election Day that its only polling place would move outside city limits to a remote location more than a mile away from the nearest bus stop.

National Republicans Boosting Karen Handel in Georgia’s 6th District
NRCC going up with $1.4M in TV ads on Atlanta broadcast

Rep. Karen Handel, R-Ga., is running for her first full term in Georgia’s 6th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The campaign arm of House Republicans is investing more than a million dollars in Georgia’s 6th District, which was home to the most expensive House election in history last year. 

The National Republican Campaign Committee has made a $1.4 million TV buy on Atlanta broadcast, set to begin this week. It’s the first outside spending from one of the party committees in a race that has thus far looked safer for Republicans than it did in 2017 during its high-profile special election. 

November Elections Bring High Stakes for Medicaid
From expansion to work requirements, the future of the program hangs in the balance

What voters do at the polls Nov. 6 will shape access to Medicare in several states. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The midterm elections could bring sweeping changes to Medicaid, from possible eligibility expansions to new rules requiring low-income people to work, depending on voters’ choices for governors’ offices and state legislatures across the country.

Medicaid covers more people than any other federally funded health program.

Anti-Hacking 18-Wheeler Parks Near the Capitol
Congressional aides got some advice from IBM experts ahead of the midterms

The IBM C-TOC training room seats 20 staffers and was standing room only during the training on Thursday. (Alex Gangitano/ Roll Call)

Congressional staffers naively joined a public Wi-Fi network as they settled in for an hour-long cybersecurity training. Little did they know that any websites they browsed on their phones were about to flash on a giant screen.

There was nothing too embarrassing. At least one person was killing time on ESPN.com.

Ex-HHS Secretary Price Spreads Cash Around in Georgia Races
Former congressman donates maximum to gubernatorial candidate Kemp from leftover campaign funds

Former secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tom Price’s tenure in Washington may have ended, but he’s still spending campaign cash.

Price’s congressional campaign committee has disbursed $55,000 to campaigns in recent weeks, with the bulk going to candidates in his native Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Cory Gardner Has a Really Good Mitch McConnell Impression
Take Five: Gardner’s staff wants him to act cool in front of celebrities

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., never got to tell Powers Boothe that he loves “Red Dawn.” (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Cory Gardner’s impression of Mitch McConnell was spot-on as he described that time during the tax debate when the pair talked marijuana.

The Colorado Republican has embraced the cannabis industry. But some of his colleagues aren’t so sure.

Is Beto O’Rourke the Next Jon Ossoff?
Democrats can’t seem to help falling for white, Southern men in unlikely races

Democrat Beto O’Rourke historic fundraising numbers set off alarm bells in the GOP that the Texas Senate race was not one to be ignored, Murphy writes. Above, O’Rourke arrives for a rally in Lockhart, Texas, on Oct. 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — There have been so many glowing profiles of Beto O’Rourke, the Democratic Senate hopeful in Texas, that there is a running joke  among journalists about the ingredients for a perfect O’Rourke piece. The short version goes something like this: He looks like a Kennedy! He’s got tons of cash! He’s a Democrat in a Red State! Let’s do this thing!

The one detail that’s almost always missing in those profiles is reality — namely, the fact that O’Rourke could run a perfect race against Sen. Ted Cruz and will still probably lose based solely on the fact that far more Republicans are likely to vote in Texas this November than Democrats. Although twice as many Texans (about 1 million) voted in the Democratic primary this year compared to 2014, 1.5 million votes were cast in the Republican primary. Even as the state’s demographics are changing, the math for Texas Democrats still doesn’t look good.

D.C. Eatery Serves Pizza With a Side of Female Democrats for Congress
Pizza Paradiso has pizzas for Ortiz Jones, Ocasio-Cortez, Underwood and Sinema

Drew McCormick, left, and Ruth Gresser, right, researched Democratic female candidates who would be “firsts.” (Thomas McKinless/ CQ Roll Call)

Forget eating pizza. These politicians are becoming it.

At least that’s the vision of chef Ruth Gresser, who owns Pizzeria Paradiso in D.C. She’s celebrating a handful of female candidates this cycle with a mozzarella salute, complete with a beer pairing.

Trump Vows to Test Warren DNA Himself If Senator Becomes 2020 Opponent
‘That will not be something I’ll enjoy doing, either’

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Comptroller of the Currency Joseph M. Otting, during a Senate Banking Committee hearing in Dirksen Building titled “Implementation of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act,” on October 2, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump now says he wants to personally test the DNA of Sen. Elizabeth Warren if she becomes his Democratic opponent in 2020.

Trump said Monday that he does not owe $1 million to charity after the Democratic senator from Massachusetts’ DNA test results pointed to at least a sliver of Native American ancestry.