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Progress on federal data privacy bill slows in both chambers
Consensus is elusive, say congressional aides, industry sources and lobbyists

Senate Commerce Chairman Roger Wicker says “there has been no timetable” for a data privacy bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers and industry groups want to pass a federal data privacy law this year, but progress on the measure has slowed. It’s now unclear whether legislation resembling California’s tough requirements on the tech industry can clear hurdles in Congress and be signed into law before the end of the year. 

Small bipartisan groups of lawmakers in both chambers are working on draft legislation that was supposed to have been unveiled in May but has been delayed and is now expected to be released sometime before the August congressional recess. 

Photos of the Week: Biden in DC, Trudeau at the Capitol and victory for the Bad News Babes
The week of June 17 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Democratic candidate Joe Biden speaks during the Poor People’s Moral Action Congress forum for presidential candidates at Trinity Washington University on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

This week, Hope Hicks testified behind closed doors, the Canadian prime minister visited the Capitol Building to collect on his bet with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Bad News Babes won the annual Congressional Softball Game.

All that and more below. Here’s the entire week in photos:

3 things to watch: Before any Iran conflict, Trump faces war within his own team
'Iran made a very big mistake,' president warns in cryptic tweet after U.S. drone shot down

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, and Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., are among the more promiment hawks when it comes to Iran. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS | Donald Trump is facing one of the biggest tests of his presidency after Iran shot down a U.S. military aircraft, prompting him to declare the islamic republic “made a very big mistake.”

His tweet at 10:16 a.m. Thursday broke the nearly 15 hours of essential White House silence on the missile takedown of the RQ-4 Global Hawk drone aircraft. But the U.S. commander in chief did not suggest he is ready to respond — even after a top Iranian official admitted the shootdown was meant as a “clear message” to Washington.

Opponent pounces after Duncan Hunter’s wife switches to guilty plea
“Those who know Hunter the most, trust him the least,” Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar says

Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar is seeking a rematch against GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter in California’s 50th District. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democrat challenging indicted Rep. Duncan Hunter went on the attack Thursday after the California Republican’s wife entered a guilty plea in the federal campaign finance case against her and her husband. 

Margaret Hunter pleaded guilty Thursday to a single count of conspiracy to misuse campaign funds, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported. The plea comes with a sentence of up to five years and a fine of $250,000. 

Women senators ‘shame the guys to hurry up and vote’
Female lawmakers push their male colleagues to pick up the pace

Her female colleagues said it was Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s idea to shame their male colleagues into getting their business done in the time allotted. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The women of the United States Senate took their colleagues to task Wednesday for taking too long to vote.

In the middle of a vote series that typically would have appeared mundane— with members frequently leaving the floor during one vote and returning during the next, or sitting in the cloakroom on their cell phones — most of the women were seated at desks, calling for regular order in an attempt to speed up what have become increasingly long series.

Are you Shakespeare or Tim McGraw? Your Hill horoscope
What’s happening around D.C. the week of June 10–16

Members of Congress will recite lines from the Bard on Monday night. What could go wrong? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“Friends, Romans, congressmen, lend me your ears.” Members of Congress and Washington influencers will come out Monday to recite the words of the most influential writer and lyricist of all-time: Drake, er sorry, William Shakespeare. The event, hosted by the Shakespeare Theatre Company, kicks off at 7:30 p.m., and proceeds support the company’s educational, artistic and community engagement initiatives.

If you see lights glowing from the National Mall Tuesday night, don’t worry, the aliens haven’t arrived … yet. It’s “Glow Yoga on the Mall,” a vinyasa flow session hosted by D.C. Fray and other District yogis. The child’s poses and downward dogs begin at 8 p.m. Tickets can be purchased in advance for $25.

Democrats want to require Pentagon to study climate change risks on military bases
It’s the latest effort by House Democrats to scrutinize and quantify the challenges a warming planet poses to the military

Colorado Rep. Jason Crow, center, wants to include language in the NDAA bill that would require the Pentagon to more aggressively study the risks posed to its bases by climate change. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats will seek to include in the proposed National Defense Authorization Act language that would require the Pentagon to more aggressively study the risks posed to its bases by climate change, their latest effort to scrutinize and quantify the challenges a warming planet poses to the military.

Colorado Rep. Jason Crow unveiled a summary of the measure Thursday, saying it will be included in the chairman’s mark to be offered by Washington Rep. Adam Smith, who leads the House Armed Services Committee that takes up the bill June 12.

Left and right unite around a common enemy: the burpee
‘No one likes it,’ admits workout maestro Rep. Markwayne Mullin

Lawmakers work out alongside NFL players Wednesday in honor of Men’s Health Month. (Courtesy Jini Hernández)

The mood in Washington today may be filled with partisan rancor, but a bipartisan group of lawmakers is determined not to let it break their bonds of (dis)affection for the squat thrust.

The burpee is the perfect exercise, congressman and possible sadist Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma said, whose Men’s Health Caucus led a Wednesday morning workout in the lead-up to Father’s Day. 

Bipartisan thumbs-down to facial recognition technology
Surveillance sparks comparisons to Orwellian dystopia

A Customs and Border Protection officer scans a traveler entering the United States in February 2018 at Miami International Airport. The use of facial recognition technology by the government violates the First and Fourth amendments, some lawmakers believe. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

In 2016, police officers in Baltimore used new technology to scan the faces of protesters who filled the city’s streets following the death in custody of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man. Among those whose most recognizable features may have been documented was Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Democratic chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

Three years later, Cummings is still angry such surveillance was conducted without a warrant or reason to believe that he — or any other protester, for that matter — had done anything illegal. Now he’s putting the full weight of his committee’s jurisdiction behind a push to ban facial recognition technology until Congress can pass comprehensive legislation to govern its use.

Democrat criticizes Rep. Duncan Hunter for posing with enemy corpse
In defending Navy SEAL accused of war crimes, congressman says posing with enemy dead was common practice

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., claimed on Saturday that he and other Marines posed for photos with dead enemies when they served in the Middle East in the early 2000s. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democratic opponent of Rep. Duncan Hunter battered him for admitting that he posed for a photo with a slain enemy combatant while serving with the U.S. Marines in the early 2000s.

Hunter, a Republican, won re-election over Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar in California’s 50th District in 2018 despite being indicted on 60 counts related to spending more than $250,000 in campaign cash for personal expenses that included vacations to Italy and Hawaii, dental work, and flying his family’s pet rabbit across the country.