House and Senate primaries

5 Takeaways From Heidi Cruz’s Atlantic Interview
Ted Cruz’s wife had to grapple with her place in the world as she made sacrifices for her husband

Heidi Cruz and and daughters Caroline, right, and Catherine greet guests during a convocation in March 2015 at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., where Sen. Ted Cruz announced his candidacy for president. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In a candid interview with The Atlantic, Heidi Cruz discussed the ways her life has been shaped by the political pursuits of her husband, Sen. Ted Cruz.

The Texas Republican faces a re-election challenge from Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who despite record fundraising totals, has lost momentum in the polls. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rates the race Likely Republican.

Sherrod Brown: ‘Desperate’ Sexual Assault Claims Won’t Work
Challenger Jim Renacci says, without evidence, that he’s heard accusations from multiple women

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, labeled his midterm election opponent, Rep. Jim Renacci, R-Ohio, “desperate” for levying allegations of sexual assault against him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Sherrod Brown summarily dismissed unsubstantiated allegations of sexual assault levied against him by his opponent in the upcoming midterms, Rep. Jim Renacci, labeling the Ohio Republican’s claims “desperate.”

“Congressman Renacci’s failed and desperate campaign gets worse every day,” Brown’s campaign said in a statement, multiple outlets reported Wednesday.

House GOP Incumbents Spent Hundreds of Thousands in Legal Fees to Head Off Crises
Mia Love, Scott Taylor, Chris Collins and Duncan Hunter all face competitive races

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., spent nearly $185,000 in campaign money on legal fees in the third quarter that ended Sept. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least six House Republicans combined to spend more than $325,000 in campaign funds in the most recent quarter alone on legal or crisis management fees related to brewing scandals that have wended their way into the court of public opinion — and, in some cases, real courtrooms.

New York Rep. Chris Collins, whom federal authorities indicted on Aug. 8 on 10 counts related to insider trading and securities fraud, shelled out $30,980.25 from his campaign account to the D.C.-based law firm BakerHostetler just three days later.

Mia Love Claims FEC Cleared Her — Others Say Not So Fast
Utah GOP rep raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for primary race she didn’t face

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, has been nagged by an ongoing dispute about money she raised for a primary race that never happened. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Utah Rep. Mia Love does not appear to be out of the woods just yet over a complaint filed with the Federal Election Commission over funds she raised for a GOP primary race she allegedly knew she would not have.

That’s despite Love claiming in a statement Monday night that the FEC has cleared her of any wrongdoing after she agreed to re-designate roughly $370,000 in campaign contributions made between the GOP nominating convention in April and the June primary date, when Love did not face a Republican challenger.

NewDemPAC Helps Candidates Navigate Trump, Raise Money
Political arm of New Democrat Coalition has endorsed 38 recruits

NewDemPAC has endorsed Virginia Democrat Abigail Spanberger, who’s challenging GOP Rep. Dave Brat in the 7th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With 38 endorsed candidates, the political arm of the moderate New Democrat Coalition is hoping to play a significant role helping Democrats win the House majority next month, and in doing so, grow their own business-friendly caucus. 

The coalition’s political action committee, founded in 2005, got involved in races earlier than ever before this cycle — at times choosing favorites in competitive primaries. It also hired a political director for the first time and has been able to help raise more than $2 million for candidates from members and donors.

Trump to Headline Rally for Sen. Ted Cruz in Texas Ahead of Midterms
Dem opponent O’Rourke is mounting one of most expensive campaigns in history to unseat Cruz

President Donald Trump will rally for Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, next Monday, Oct. 22. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump will rally Texans for Sen. Ted Cruz in Houston next Monday, Oct. 22, as Cruz’s race with Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke enters the home stretch before the Nov. 6 midterm elections there.

Trump had promised in August to campaign on Cruz’s behalf, a promise Cruz heartily welcomed.

Fewer White Men Running for Office As Women and Minorities Step Up, Report Finds
Study finds congressional, state legislative races are more diverse in 2018

A marcher at the Woman’s March on Washington holds a sign in Spanish that reads “Woman’s rights = Human rights” on Jan. 21, 2017 one day after Donald Trump’s inauguration. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)

The 2018 primary season has seen a drastic decline of white men running for office in congressional and state races, as more women and minorities have joined the fray, according to report released Thursday.

There has been a 13 percent drop in white, male Congressional candidates since 2012, and a 12 percent drop in legislative races, the report from the Reflective Democracy Campaign found. 

It Turns Out Democrats Are Really Bad at Getting Mad
They’re doing their best scorched-earth impression of Mitch McConnell. It isn’t working

Fight fire with fire, says Hillary Clinton. Civility can wait. But Democrats do a pretty weak impression of Mitch McConnell, Shapiro writes. (Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

OPINION — Anger in politics is like the porridge in “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” — it has to be just right.

Too little anger breeds a sense of complacency and decreases the urgency of voting. Too much anger produces self-defeating rhetoric that repels the very undecided voters that you are struggling to attract.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski Could Face Reprisal from Alaska GOP
Alaska Republican was only member of her party to vote against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, talks with the media in the Capitol after voting “no” on a cloture vote that advanced the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to a final vote on October 5, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski could face severe consequences from her state party for her decision to reject new associate Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh at his confirmation vote over the weekend.

The Alaska Republican was the only GOP senator to oppose Kavanaugh’s confirmation, which passed 50-48 mostly along party lines. (Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., voted with Republicans.)

‘Come On Ted’: Richard Linklater Mocks Cruz’s Embrace of Trump
‘Bernie’ actor Sonny Carl Davis reprises role explaining what ‘Texas tough’ means

Actor Sonny Carl Davis, who made a scene-stealing performance in Richard Linklater’s “Bernie,” explains how a real Texan would react to President Donald Trump’s shots at Sen. Ted Cruz. (FTC PAC)

Is Ted Cruz tough as Texas? Richard Linklater doesn’t seem to think so.

The acclaimed director and Houston native is behind a new ad taunting the Republican senator for his embrace of President Donald Trump despite the men’s bitter rivalry during the 2016 GOP presidential primaries.