impeachment

Reporter’s Notebook: Precedent, the reason Senate rules feel ‘made up’

Niels Lesniewski talks about his deep dive into the 1936 impeachment of a federal judge from Florida. (Graham MacGillivray/CQ Roll Call)

CQ Roll Call reporter Niels Lesniewski took a deep dive into the history of impeachment ahead of the Senate trial for President Donald Trump. He found some pertinent parallels in a 1936 impeachment case of a federal judge from Florida that involved the House adding articles of impeachment after a Senate trial began.

Watch as he takes us through the weird rabbit hole he jumped down for this archived story.

GAO: Trump’s hold on Ukraine aid violated budget law
1974 budget law limits presidential authority to prohibit congressionally approved spending

President Donald Trump boards Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in October. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Government Accountability Office said in an opinion Thursday that President Donald Trump violated federal budget law when he ordered White House officials to withhold most of a $250 million military aid package for Ukraine last summer.

The finding comes after House Democrats delivered articles of impeachment on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress grounds stemming from the Ukraine affair to the Senate Wednesday evening, triggering the Senate trial expected to start next week.

Pelosi signs articles of impeachment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi gets up after signing the articles of impeachment during an engrossment ceremony Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Ink | On the Edge of Her Seat

Impeachment articles’ path to Senate governed by rules and precedent
Before trial starts, expect pomp, circumstance and ceremony

The articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton lie on the desk of Secretary of the Senate Gary Sisco on Dec. 19, 1998, after House Judiciary Chairman Henry J. Hyde delivered them from the House floor after the impeachment votes. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Correction appended Jan. 14, 2:10 p.m. | The expected House vote this week to name impeachment managers for the Senate trial and authorize them to spend House funds will set in motion a set of established steps that will guide the articles of impeachment from the House to the Senate.

The resolution, which won’t be released until Speaker Nancy Pelosi meets with her caucus Tuesday morning, will appoint managers who will act as prosecutors during the Senate trial that will determine whether the impeached President Donald Trump is removed from office. They will present the case for the House impeachment articles, approved in December, which charge the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Road Ahead: Impeachment trial imminent and war powers debate continues
Pelosi ready to send articles to Senate this week

Speaker Nancy Pelosi conducts her weekly news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Impeachment action is bound for the Senate this week, ending the long standoff between Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over the framework of President Donald Trump’s trial. Pelosi intends to send the House’s articles of impeachment to the Senate and name impeachment managers, launching a trial that could begin before the week is out.

The impeachment articles, which the House approved in December, charge the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Capitol Ink | Fast Aging Baby New Year

Road ahead: House to debate Iran war powers as impeachment articles hold continues
Senate moving ahead with regular business while awaiting impeachment articles to start trial

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell heads to a briefing with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the Capitol on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers hope a partisan dispute over Senate trial procedures for considering the House’s impeachment charges against President Donald Trump will be resolved this week. But a solution to the impasse could be complicated by another fight brewing in Congress over whether to restrain Trump’s ability to go to war with Iran.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is holding the impeachment articles in the House in an effort to force Senate Republicans to agree to Democrats’ demands for certain witnesses and documents to be subpoenaed in the trial. The California Democrat has yet to indicate when she would transmit the articles to the Senate or lay out explicit conditions under which she would do so.

Hawley proposes Senate rule change forcing House to deliver impeachment articles

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., speaks with reporters after a vote in Oct. 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Protesters and police in disarray amid anti-Trump demonstrations

Protesters participate in the "Swarm the Senate" rally in the Hart Senate Office Building urging action to "impeach, remove, indict and jail" President Trump on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)