Impeachment hearing

Do points of order eat up all of a committee’s time?
There are rules in the House Judiciary Committee to ensure that both parties get their allotted time

Rep. Jamie Raskin reads a copy of “The Federalist Papers” during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry on Monday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

While there were a number of them in Monday’s House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, points of order do not take up the opposing party’s time in House Judiciary committee proceedings, according to Communications Director Shadawn Reddick-Smith, and there are several rules in place to ensure that. 

Protester interrupts start of impeachment hearing

A protester interrupts the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Livestream: House Judiciary hears impeachment inquiry evidence

Members of the House Judiciary Committee hear evidence from the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Presenting are lawyers for the majority and minority sides of the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees.

‘We’re all mad’ — Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Dec. 2, 2019

George Washington University Law School professor Jonathan Turley reviews papers before the start of the House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Word play draws pushback at impeachment hearing

Stanford Law professor Pamela Karlan testifies during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

A witness in the House Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment inquiry hearing apologized Wednesday afternoon for comments she made during the hearing about President Donald Trump’s youngest son, Barron Trump.

Responding to a question from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, Pamela Karlan, a Stanford Law professor, said, “the Constitution says there can be no titles of nobility. So while the president can name his son Barron, he can’t make him a baron.”

Live stream: Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment inquiry hearing
Constitutional law experts testify on impeachment

To beat Trump, Democrats need to win Wisconsin. The impeachment inquiry isn't helping.
CQ on Congress, Ep. 177

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives to testify before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday, November 20, 2019. Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, also testified. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Live: House Intelligence impeachment hearing with Fiona Hill and David Holmes

Dr. Fiona Hill, the former senior director for Europe and Russia on the National Security Council, and David Holmes, a Foreign Service officer who works for Ambassador William Taylor at the U.S Embassy in Kyiv, Ukraine, testify before the House Intelligence Committee Thursday.

Live: House Intelligence impeachment hearing with Kurt Volker and Tim Morrison