Jerrold Nadler

Photos of the Week: Three Resignations, a CR Extension and the Holidays Kick Off
The week of Dec. 4 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Ranking member Rep. Jerrold Nadler arrives Thursday for the House Judiciary Committee hearing on oversight of the FBI. Nadler became the top Democrat on the panel following Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr.’s resignation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 10:08 a.m.The week on the Hill was not short on news. Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr. resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct while Minnesota Sen. Al Franken, a fellow Democrat, announced he intended to do the same soon. Late Thursday, Republican Trent Franks from Arizona said he would resign effective Jan. 31 over sexual harassment allegations in his office.

At the same time, the funding deadline to keep the government open loomed. But a government shutdown was averted Thursday — at least for another two weeks — when both chambers passed a continuing resolution through Dec. 22. 

Bobby Scott Passes on Seeking Judiciary Committee Post
Virginia Democrat left panel in 2015 to become ranking member on Education panel

Rep. Robert C. Scott of Virginia said he was not interested in vying for the top Democratic slot on the Judiciary Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Robert C. Scott, D-Va., told Roll Call Tuesday he’s not interested in becoming ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, a role that is in question since Michigan’s John Conyers Jr. has agreed to temporarily step aside from the post amid allegations of sexual misconduct.

Jerrold Nadler of New York and Zoe Lofgren of California both are interested in serving as ranking member of the committee.

Conyers Scandal Creates Opening for House Democrats
Leaving Judiciary post after 23 years means new liberal messenger in age of Trump

From left, Reps.  Jerrold Nadler of New York, Zoe Lofgren of California and John Conyers Jr. of Michigan at a House Judiciary Committee news conference in 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The forced amble toward the exits by Rep. John Conyers Jr. is accelerating one of the most consequential power vacuums in Congress in the eyes of the Democratic base.

The moment is as much about the party positioning itself for the future as it is about managing sexual harassment problems in the present.

Conyers Admits Settlement With Employee Over Sexual Harassment Case
Michigan Democrat denies allegations after initially saying he didn’t settle

Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr. is facing allegations that he sexually harassed female staff members. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After initially denying that he has settled sexual with any current or former staff members, Rep. John Conyers Jr. admitted Tuesday that he had reached a monetary settlement with a former staff member. But he said the case was resolved “with an express denial of liability.”

“I expressly and vehemently denied the allegations made against me, and continue to do so,” the Michigan Democrat said in a statement, first reported by The Washington Post.

Sessions Defends His Reputation in First House Testimony
“I will not accept, and reject accusations I have ever lied”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions arrives to testify before a House Judiciary hearing Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions vigorously defended himself Tuesday against “false charges” that he was untruthful in previous testimony about his role in Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and any connections to Russian operatives.

“I will not accept, and reject accusations I have ever lied,” Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing stretching for five-and-a-half hours. “That is a lie.”

Sessions Defends His Reputation in First House Testimony
‘I will not accept, and reject accusations I have ever lied’

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is sworn into a House Judiciary Committee hearing in Rayburn Building on oversight of the Department of Justice on November 14, 2017, where he fielded questions on Russian meddling in the 2016 election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions vigorously defended himself Tuesday against “false charges” that he was untruthful in previous testimony about his role in Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and any connections to Russian operatives.

“I will not accept, and reject accusations I have ever lied,” Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing lasting more than 5 hours. “That is a lie.”

Pelosi Pledges to Use ‘Every Avenue’ Against Trump
House Democrats file censure of president over Charlottesville response

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi praised a resolution filed by House Democrats that aims to censure the president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi pledged on Friday to use “every avenue” to challenge President Donald Trump after three House Democrats filed a resolution condemning how the president responded to the violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The censure resolution denounces Trump for not immediately and specifically condemning neo-Nazi and white nationalist groups who took part in the protest and then doubling down on his comments days later, saying some of the far-right protesters were “very fine people.”

Four House Committees to Vote on Trump Controversies
To include: Comey, taxpayer money to Trump and Trump International Hotel lease

Labor union groups join anti-Trump protesters outside of the Trump International Hotel in Washington on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016. Protesters gathered outside of the hotel as Presidential candidate Donald Trump held a ribbon cutting ceremony inside to officially open the hotel for business in the Old Post Office Building. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Using an obscure tactic, House Democrats will force their GOP colleagues to take controversial committee votes this week over President Donald Trump’s business ties and the government’s widening Russia probe.

The votes also will deal with the firing of former FBI Director James B. Comey, taxpayer money to the Trump Organization and the government’s lease of the Old Post Office Building to the Trump International Hotel in Washington.

Word on the Hill: Watergate Anniversary
Harris to be recognized

From left, Connecticut Sen. Lowell P. Weicker Jr., Florida Sen. Edward J. Gurney, Chief minority counsel (and later senator) Fred Thompson, Tennessee Sen. Howard H. Baker Jr., North Carolina Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr., Chief counsel Samuel Dash, Georgia Sen. Herman E. Talmadge, Hawaii Sen. Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii, and New Mexico Sen. Joseph M. Montoya during the Senate Watergate hearings. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been 45 years since Watergate and the landmark hotel where it all began wants to talk about how the scandal reverberates today.

Rakel Cohen, co-owner of the hotel, is hosting a “Watergate Chat” Wednesday evening with The Atlantic’s Steve Clemons to discuss the break-in and how it relates to current politics. 5 p.m. at The Watergate Hotel (2650 Virginia Ave. NW)

Opinion: Pardon Me? A Constitutional Amendment Would Fix That
Congress should act quickly

President Donald Trump would be smart to get behind an effort to prohibit presidents from pardoning themselves, Allen writes. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

There’s at least one big hole in the Constitution when it comes to the president’s power: He can pardon himself.

“He shall have the power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment,” the founders wrote. Simple, straightforward, easy to understand. Maybe the revolutionary generation didn’t give much thought to the possibility that a president would find it necessary or advisable to pardon himself. The Federalist Papers: No. 74, which deals with the powers of the chief executive to grant leniency, doesn’t even contemplate a self-pardon.