John Boozman

Congressional Offices Announced as Democracy Award Finalists to Help Establish Trust in Congress
Congressional Management Foundation picks finalists in four categories

Arizona Rep. David Schweikert and Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, right, are among the finalists. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

To try to “restore a little faith” in Congress, the Congressional Management Foundation on Friday announced the finalists for its first Democracy Awards.

The organization chose its finalists for their focus on constituent services, their workplace environment, innovation, and transparency.

Democrats Land Recruit Against Arkansas’ French Hill
Clarke Tucker faces an uphill race against the well-funded Republican

The DCCC is targeting Arkansas Rep. French Hill in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

No Democrat represents Arkansas at the federal level. National Democrats are excited about state Rep. Clarke Tucker’s prospects of changing that. 

Tucker, an attorney, entered the race against GOP Rep. French Hill in the 2nd District on Monday. He faces an uphill climb. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales rates the race Solid Republican.

Renewed Scrutiny for Cotton’s Cease-And-Desist Letters to Constituents
Arkansas man says he was threatened with letter in June for using an expletive

Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton has been criticized for his office’s practice of sending cease and desist letters to some constituents who call in. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Arkansas Republican Sen. Tom Cotton’s office is under the First Amendment microscope again for its practice of sending cease-and-desist letters to constituents who call in and use coarse language.

Arkansan Don Ernst said he was threatened with a cease-and-desist letter after he called Cotton’s office 17 times last year from January to June asking about the senator’s response to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, and how Cotton would deal with the opioid crisis if the 2010 health care law was repealed, Ernst revealed on a The Sexy Pundits podcast Sunday.

F-Bombs and C-Word Prompted Cotton Cease and Desist Letters
Recipients of letters argue they can use coarse language if they want

The office of Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., sent a number of cease and desist letters after a slew of calls from constituents using coarse language. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Incessant phone calls and abusive language prompted Sen. Tom Cotton’s office to mail cease and desist letters to members of the liberal activist group Ozark Indivisible, in October.

One of those constituents, Stacey Lane of Fayetteville, Arkansas, told ArkansasOnline that she received the ultimatum after “an f-bomb or two” during phone conversations with Cotton staffers.

Senators Go Their Own Way on Stopgap Funding
‘We can’t pass the House bill,’ GOP chairmen say

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., says his colleagues are preparing to fully revamp the temporary spending bill. “The House bill is not going to pass over here,” he said this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators are preparing to completely rework the temporary spending bill needed to keep much of government open past Dec. 22.

The legislation will be stripped of the House-passed Defense appropriations bill and a partisan measure reauthorizing the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which many expected. But its length will also likely change, and it may or may not carry new topline spending levels for appropriators to construct a final fiscal 2018 omnibus package.

A Huge Congressional Settlement Involving Sexual Harassment — And Hardly Anyone Knew
Lawmakers on Helsinki Commission blindsided by report of $220K payout

Florida Rep. Alcee L. Hastings has denied allegations of sexual misconduct that led to a $220,000 payment to a former congressional staffer. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The $220,000 paid to former staffer Winsome Packer in 2014 is by far the largest known settlement involving Congress and accusations of sexual harassment in recent years.

But few, if any, of the lawmakers who served on the congressional commission where Packer worked seem to have been informed about it until the sum was reported by Roll Call on Friday.  

Word on the Hill: Dine With the Presidents
Cummings sends off grads, and honoring veterans

“Dads of Democracy.” (Courtesy District Winery)

This weekend, why not eat with all the presidents watching you? District Winery’s new restaurant, Ana, has unique artwork in its dining area featuring 44 presidents.

Ana is located in Navy Yard on Water Street SE.

Sen. Boozman to Have Follow-Up Heart Surgery
Change in August recess delayed operation

Sen. John Boozman underwent emergency heart surgery in 2014 to fix a torn aorta. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. John Boozman was scheduled to have a follow-up heart operation during the first week of August. That all changed when the Senate pushed back the start of August recess.

Now the Arkansas Republican is set to have the procedure in northern Virginia Tuesday, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported.

Photos of the Day: Health Care Protests Erupt Across Capitol Hill
Monday saw approximately 80 arrests, according to Capitol Police

Health care protesters from Arkansas chant outside of the office of Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday. About a dozen people loudly voiced opposition to the GOP health care bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate returned from recess Monday and was greeted by protesters who oppose the GOP plan to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

Throughout the handful of House and Senate office buildings on Capitol Hill, protesters began demonstrating around 2 p.m. Monday, according to a statement by the United States Capitol Police. As of 4:30 p.m., 80 protesters had been arrested after they “refused to cease and desist” from “unlawful demonstration activities.”

A Day That’s Both Routinized and Indelibly the President’s Own
Trump’s populist tone, churlish crowd, combine with ageless Capitol pomp

From left, First lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Major General Bradley Becker, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence review the troops following Donald Trump’s swearing-in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

If inaugurations are like weddings — the central figures remain singular and the emotional sensibilities vary, but the liturgies are similar and the outcome is always the same — then the opening day of Donald Trump’s presidency absolutely kept the metaphor relevant.

On Friday, he became the only billionaire, the only brand personification and the only person without any prior experience as a public servant to take the oath of office. And then he excoriated the capital establishment arrayed around him using caustic language and campaign-rally cadences particularly discordant for an inaugural address.