Kathleen Rice

Kathleen Rice Passes on Running for New York Attorney General
Representative eyed position after Eric Scheniderman resigned

Rep. Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., announced she would not run for New York Attorney General. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic Rep. Kathleen Rice announced Tuesday she would pass on running to become New York’s attorney general after Eric Schneiderman resigned.

Rice was encouraged to run by others but ultimately the legal constraints prevented her from running, she said in a statement.

Drafting Cotton May Not Work Again for Gallagher in ACLI Capital Challenge
Wisconsin Republican won for the lawmakers in last year’s 3-mile race

Wisconsin Republican Rep. Mike Gallagher runs twice a week. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

 

Rep. Mike Gallagher has been running along to his “ACLI 2018 Crush Cotton” playlist to prepare for Wednesday’s 3-mile race.

Potential FEC Violations Cast Shadow on Rice’s Possible AG Run
New York congresswoman’s old district attorney account has been used for

Rep. Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., could see a campaign for the vacant New York attorney general post hindered by potential campaign finance violations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Kathleen Rice, a leading name to replace former New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, could be dogged in the coming months by a batch of potential campaign finance violations involving her old district attorney campaign account.

Rice never deactivated the account from when she was elected Nassau County district attorney after she lost to Scheiderman in the 2010 Democratic primary for state attorney general. Since winning election to the House in New York’s 4th District in 2014, she has subsequently spent thousands of dollars from the DA campaign account on ads, consulting services, and donations to local Democratic groups that have actively worked on her elections to the House, according to a report by Crain’s New York.

Two House Democrats Eye New York Attorney General Runs
NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman resigned after abuse allegations

Reps. Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., and Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y., are both considering running for New York attorney general. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two House Democrats are considering running for New York attorney general following Eric Schneiderman’s swift resignation Tuesday night.

Four women came forward in a New Yorker article accusing Schneiderman of physically abusing them. He denied the allegations but resigned hours after the story published. 

Members Bond Over ‘Miserable’ Workout
Nine members of Congress did Solidcore with HOH

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema exercise together before work. (Thomas McKinless/ CQ Roll Call)

As lawmakers traded harsh words over the omnibus, some were also trading bipartisan high-fives.

In the middle of last week’s spending clash, nine members took a break for a hard-core workout. HOH joined them for an early morning Solidcore class. 

Stormy Daniels Lawsuit Raises Election Law Questions for Trump
Democratic lawmakers have asked FBI to investigate payments from president’s lawyer to porn actress

Pornographic actress Stormy Daniels alleges she had an affair with President Donald Trump during the months after first lady Melania Trump gave birth to their son, Barron Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As special counsel Robert S. Mueller III continues to probe members of President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign for possible collusion with Russia, some lawmakers have raised ethical concerns over the president’s alleged cover-up of an affair with porn actress Stormy Daniels.

Reps. Kathleen Rice of New York and Ted Lieu of California, both former prosecutors, have asked the FBI to investigate payments from Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, to Daniels, who filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the president in Los Angeles Superior Court.

Opinion: The Real Year of the Woman
Female lawmakers are playing outsize role in sexual harassment debate

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., resigned after he reportedly suggested that a female staffer carry his child for $5 million and then retaliated against her when she balked. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It takes a special kind of depravity for a congressman to suggest to a female staffer that she carry his child for $5 million and then retaliate against her when she declines the offer, as former Rep. Trent Franks reportedly did last year.

Nobody is winning a profile in courage award for asking female staff members to cuddle with him in his apartment and then firing them after they refuse, as former Rep. John Conyers Jr. was accused of doing before he resigned in disgrace. And you’d think that voters would somehow weed out a senator who apparently had a groping habit before he was ever in politics, but former Sen. Al Franken proved that conventional wisdom wrong.

Bipartisan Group Wants to End Taxpayer Money for Harassment Settlements
Members led by Rep. Ron Desantis also aim to disclose settlements dating back to 1995

Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., is interviewed by a TV news crew outside of the House chamber. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of members announced legislation that would end the practice of using taxpayer money to settle claims of sexual harassment on Capitol Hill.

Republican Reps. Ron DeSantis of Florida and Tennessee’s Marsha Blackburn were joined by Democratic Reps. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, Jim Cooper also of Tennessee and Kathleen Rice of New York. 

Word on the Hill: This Isn’t ‘House of Cards’
Girls Nation, tennis and whisleblowers

Actor Paul Sparks spoke about being diagnosed with diabetes at 28-years-old at a Senate Aging Committee hearing Wednesday. (Alex Gangitano/ CQ Roll Call)

The author writing a book about Frank and Claire Underwood in Netflix’s “House of Cards” was on Capitol Hill on Wednesday — well, the actor who plays him was.

Paul Sparks, who plays Tom Yates on the show and also stars on HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire,” testified before the Senate Aging Committee on diabetes research.

Word on the Hill: Week Ahead
Your social schedule for the week

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Republican Conference continue debate over health care this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Welcome back to another full legislative week.

It won’t be as hot as it has been after the temperature drops tonight, so you might actually want to get outside tomorrow.