Kay Granger

Word on the Hill: Making D.C. History
Breakfast honoring service dog advocates, and #280Characters

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, right, shown here with D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, will receive an award from the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

What do Jose Andres and Eleanor Holmes Norton have in common? The nation’s capital.

The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., is presenting its Making D.C. History Awards tonight to them and other Washingtonians who have positively influenced the city.

House Passes $658 Billion Defense Spending Bill

Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., and colleague Barbara Lee, D-Calif. proposed an amendment that prohibits money being spent on uniforms for the Afghan National Army. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Thursday passed the so-called security minibus appropriations package on a 235-192 vote, allocating nearly $790 billion across four separate spending bills, including $658 billion for defense.

The measure designates $584 billion in regular defense appropriations and $73.9 billion in Overseas Contingency Operations accounts.

Blame It on the Rain: House Departs for August Recess
A rainy last session day in D.C. as captured by Roll Call’s Bill Clark

Arkansas Rep. Bruce Westerman walks down the House steps in the pouring rain on Friday, following the final votes as Congress leaves town for its summer recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

While the Senate is scheduled to stay on in Washington for at least another few days to take care of legislative business, House lawmakers on Friday finished up their final votes ahead of the summer recess.

And it was just in time, too, as heavy downpours hit the nation’s capital, with a D.C. area flash flood watch in effect through Saturday afternoon.

Granger Says No Town Halls Because of ‘So Many Threats’
Texas political scientists says members have a right to be concerned

Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, said she will not hold town hall events because of threats. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Chances of Change to Defense Spending Caps Falling
Troubles confront Trump budget proposal to lift defense limits

Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., a veteran appropriator, is dubious of the proposed changes to the budget.. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican appropriators appear increasingly skeptical about President Donald Trump's eye-popping proposed changes to fiscal 2017 spending levels, including nondefense spending cuts, a proposed $30 billion defense supplemental and a $3 billion border security supplemental.

Lawmakers said in interviews that it looks increasingly unlikely that GOP lawmakers will propose — let alone pass — the needed changes to budget law to allow for Trump’s request to increase the fiscal 2017 defense cap by $25 billion and reduce the nondefense cap by $15 billion. The reductions in nondefense, which were not specified by Trump, likely would require some major, nearly immediate cuts in federal agency budgets.

House Republican Women See a Boost in Authority
3 committees, other powerful posts newly under control of 21-person caucus

Texas Rep. Kay Granger is the new chairwoman of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, which drives the allocation of more than half a trillion dollars annually to the military. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For the past four years, Republicans endured pointed barbs about how the only woman with a House committee gavel was presiding over the fittingly sexist-sounding “housekeeping committee,” the Hill’s nickname for the panel overseeing the Capitol’s internal operations.

That’s not a fair jape anymore. Exactly a century after the arrival of the first female elected to Congress, Jeannette Rankin of Montana, her GOP successors will be wielding more titular power in the Republican-run House than ever. Women will soon be presiding over three standing committees, a record for the party, while a fourth has taken over what’s arguably the chamber’s single most consequential subcommittee, because it takes the lead in apportioning more than half of all discretionary federal spending.

Word on the Hill: Inauguration Planning
Wi-Fi and portable potties

Spectators on the National Mall watch an address by President Barack Obama during his second inauguration in 2013. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

What’s your plan for the inauguration? There are plenty of galas and balls to try and get into mainly on Thursday and Friday.

Thanks to Comcast, you can look up something to do at the last minute or contact your friends easily. Through Jan. 26, the internet provider has more than 6,800 Xfinity Wi-Fi hotspots outdoors around Washington for the public to connect for free.

Frelinghuysen Poised to Take the Gavel of House Appropriations
Committee that will fund major Trump proposals set for centrist chairman

Mild-mannered New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen has largely avoided attention through two decades in Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The last time Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen popped into the spotlight was when the congressman — 61 at the time — chased down a 19-year-old pickpocket who’d mugged him in Georgetown, and held the thief until the police arrived.

Now the low-key centrist Republican from northern New Jersey is expected to become the next chairman of the powerful House Appropriations Committee at a golden moment for the GOP, with unified control of Congress and the White House for the first time in a decade.

GOP Has Chance to Elevate Female Defense Hawks
Ayotte, Granger could provide political, strategic advantages

Texas Rep. Kay Granger is vying to head the defense panel on House Appropriations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Republican Party has the opportunity to name at least two women to high-ranking national security posts in the next Congress and the incoming Trump administration, history-making moves that could help the GOP mend fences after a bruising campaign season that alienated many female voters.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, who narrowly lost her bid for a second term, is in the mix for Defense secretary, while Rep. Kay Granger of Texas is campaigning to take the gavel of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee. Both positions have, until now, only been held by men.

Which Republican Lawmakers Have Dumped Trump So Far?
GOP nominee faces backlash for lewd comments about women

Donald Trump is facing calls to step down as the Republican Party's presidential nominee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republican lawmakers are quickly distancing themselves from their GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, after leaked footage released Friday showed Trump using vulgar and graphic language in 2005 to discuss his sexual advances towards women.

While many Republicans have condemned the remarks, others went a step further. Some called on Trump to step down as their nominee and allow his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, to take the helm. Others have said they can no longer vote for Trump. Here is a list of those members of Congress.