Mark Meadows

Why Pelosi Is Likely to Be Speaker Again if Democrats Win Back House
There’s no obvious field of candidates ready to challenge her

It’s hard to see Nancy Pelosi stepping down if the Democrats take back the House next month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — “You can’t beat somebody with nobody.”

That political axiom explains in just six words why Nancy Pelosi is likely to be elected speaker if Democrats retake the House in November. No one has announced plans to challenge the California Democrat, and it’s unclear if anyone will after the election.

Trump Keeps Rosenstein Despite Reported Recording, Removal Talk
‘I have a very good relationship’ with deputy AG, president says

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves the Capitol on May 19, 2017. He is still in his job despite reported remarks about secretly recording President Trump with the goal of removing him from office. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rod Rosenstein, despite reports he discussed secretly taping President Donald Trump with the goal or removing him from office, is still the deputy attorney general after the two men spoke aboard Air Force One.

The senior Justice Department official joined Trump on the executive jet on the way to Orlando, where the president is addressing law enforcement officials. White House spokesman Hogan Gidley told reporters traveling with Trump that the duo talked for 30 minutes during the flight to Florida.

Witnesses Increasingly Wary of House GOP Probe into DOJ, FBI Bias
Pattern of broken confidentiality agreements leaves interviewees vulnerable to selective leaks, critics say

Former FBI Director James Comey turned down a request for a private meeting with the House task force looking into potential anti-Trump bias in federal law enforcement agencies, but would “welcome the opportunity to testify at a public hearing,” his attorney wrote. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Witnesses for the House GOP’s investigation into potential bias at the top levels of U.S. law enforcement have grown increasingly dubious of the probe — to the point that some actually prefer public hearings to private ones.

Case in point: Former FBI Director James Comey on Monday declined to submit to a private interview with members of the House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform panels, who comprise a joint “task force” examining whether “decisions made and not made” by the Justice Department and FBI during the 2016 Clinton email and Trump-Russia investigations were tinged with anti-Republican bias.

Trump Praises NAFTA 2.0, But Concerned Congress Will Determine Fate
With calendar tight and elections looming, several factors in play for approval

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his government signed on to a new version of the North American Free Trade Agreement on Sunday, but Congress will ultimately determine the fate of the deal. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 2:01 p.m.President Donald Trump on Monday hailed a trade pact that could replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, but the fate of the deal is soon to pass into the hands of Congress, and lawmakers have their own concerns.

And a top author of the deal says there is no major flaw to prevent Democrats from supporting it.

Republicans Likely in for a Messy December Funding, Leadership Fight
Securing border wall funding key for GOP, members to watch leadership candidates’ tactics

House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., shown talking to Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., during a press conference September 13, thinks Republicans are in a good position to secure wins in a December funding fight. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders patted themselves on the back last week for appropriating a large portion of discretionary spending before the start of the fiscal year today, but they’ve also set themselves up for messy spending fight come December over border wall funding that could complicate GOP leadership elections and potentially lead to a partial government shutdown.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan promised President Donald Trump that if he let Congress punt the Homeland Security Appropriations bill — where border wall funding would be debated — until after the November midterm elections, then House Republicans would fight for the wall then.

House Judiciary Committee Wants to Hear From Rosenstein
Rep. Mark Meadows and conservatives push for explanation about reports of wanting to tape Trump

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be called to testify in Congress behind closed doors regarding his alleged proposal to wire President Donald Trump and invoke the 25th Amendment to remove him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:05 p.m. | House Judiciary Committee Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte said Friday his committee had invited Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein for a private meeting “in the coming weeks.”

“There are many questions we have for Mr. Rosenstein, including questions about allegations made against him in a recent news article. We need to get to the bottom of these very serious claims,” Goodlatte said.

House Conservatives Want to Press Rosenstein, Regardless of His Fate with Trump
President and deputy attorney general will meet next week

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., left, and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, talk during the press conference on Sept. 6. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Conservative Republicans on the House Judiciary, and Oversight and Government Reform committees want to press Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein on comments he allegedly made about recording President Donald Trump and invoking the 25th Amendment to remove him from office.

And they want to plow ahead with their plans to bring Rosenstein before the joint panel regardless of whether Trump decides he trusts the deputy AG or jettisons him from the department.

Goodlatte Announces Plans to Subpoena McCabe Memos
Memos allegedly chronicle conversations by Rod Rosenstein on the president

House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., said Tuesday he expects to issue a subpoena for memos written by former acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe in two days. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 8:34 p.m. | House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte told reporters Tuesday evening that he plans to subpoena the Justice Department for memos Andrew McCabe wrote during his tenure as acting FBI director. The memos allegedly chronicle conversations in which Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein discussed secretly recording President Donald Trump and invoking the 25th Amendment to remove him from office.

“I had my consultation with the Democrats so that we can issue the subpoena now in two days,” the Virginia Republican said.

Trump Reverses Self on DOJ, FBI Documents He Says Show Bias
President says Justice Department, ‘key allies‘ asked him to reconsider

President Donald Trump departs the White House on Thursday for a campaign rally in Nevada. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump reversed himself on Friday on the release of reams of Justice Department and FBI documents he claims show an internal bias to wreck his 2016 campaign and then his presidency.

Trump earlier this week announced the text messages and other documents would soon be made public, per the request of House Republicans. But he backtracked in a Friday tweet, saying Justice Department officials and “key allies” urged him to avoid a huge document dump.

As Trump Waffles, House Republicans Confident They’ll Avert Shutdown
Still president, conservatives wary of GOP leaders’ government funding strategy

Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, is confident there will not be a government shutdown despite President Donald Trump’s mixed signals on the matter. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans prepare a legislative strategy with President Donald Trump seemingly on board, only for the president to catch them off guard with a last-minute tweet suggesting his opposition to the plan.

That scenario has played out a few times this year as lawmakers debated immigration and appropriations bills. And it could realistically happen again next week as Congress plans to pass legislation to avert a government shutdown that Trump has already signaled he might force.