Mark Meadows

House Democrats abandon crimes in Trump impeachment articles
Strategy focuses on constitutional, rather than criminal, violations

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler speak at a news conference Tuesday to announce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats spoke for months about how investigations had established crimes that President Donald Trump committed, but on Tuesday they did not specifically include those allegations in articles of impeachment under the constitutional standard of “high crimes and misdemeanors.”

The two articles of impeachment Democrats filed — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — stayed away from detailing where Trump might have broken the law with his dealings with Ukraine or interactions with the special counsel probe into Russian interference with the 2016 election.

House Judiciary to draft abuse of power, obstruction impeachment articles
Panel will consider the articles later this week, Nadler says

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and Maxine Waters, D-Calif., listen as Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks during the press conference to announce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats will bring two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, one saying he abused the power of his office and another that he obstructed Congress in its investigation of his conduct.

The Judiciary Committee plans to begin consideration of the articles, which are official charges against the president, on Thursday, and the full House is expected to vote next week. Opening statements at the Judiciary Committee will begin Wednesday night.

North Carolina ratings changes offer a taste of redistricting to come
After seats held by Holding and Walker lean more Democratic, one retires with the other deciding

North Carolina GOP Rep. George Holding announced his retirement after the makeup of his district changed dramatically. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Ten years is long enough to forget the chaos of covering campaigns during redistricting. But North Carolina, bless its heart, was kind enough to offer us an early taste of the upcoming craziness of a redistricting cycle.

First, new congressional lines can put new pressure on members.

Wide partisan gulf on display at impeachment hearing
First day of testimony offers little hope of mutual agreement on facts uncovered by House Democrats

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., speaks with ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump on Dec. 4. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats and Republicans might have been in the same hearing room Wednesday, but the first day of testimony in this phase of the impeachment process of President Donald Trump underscored just how little the parties are engaging with each other.

And the daylong House Judiciary Committee hearing dedicated to exploring the Constitution’s impeachment standard of “high crimes and misdemeanors” offered little hope of some mutual agreement on the facts that House Democrats uncovered, how to interpret them or the entire impeachment process.

Photos of the Week
The week of Nov. 22 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Workers hoist one of three holiday wreaths into place on the front facade of Union Station on Tuesday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A marathon of impeachment hearings dominated the week, but we also saw former Speaker John Boehner return to the Capitol for the unveiling of his portrait before Congress left town for the Thanksgiving recess.

Impeachment news roundup: Nov. 22
Trump explains why he wanted Giuliani to lead Ukraine effort, and where does the inquiry go next?

From left, Reps. Dean Phillips, D-Minn., Madeleine Dean, D-Pa., Mark Meadows, R-N.C., Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., and Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., sit in the audience during the House Intelligence Committee’s impeachment hearing on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House left town for its Thanksgiving recess on Thursday with little clarity on where the impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump goes from here.

After two weeks of public hearings with 12 witnesses, Democratic Intelligence Committee members have not said whether they will call more to testify after the Thanksgiving break.

Sondland testimony cliffhanger: Will he vindicate or implicate Trump?
Neither Democrats nor Republicans know what Sondland will say about new information since his deposition

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, testifies in public on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the House impeachment inquiry has moved from closed depositions to open hearings, lawmakers largely knew what witnesses would say. But Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union who will testify Wednesday, is a cliffhanger.

The House Intelligence Committee will hear from Sondland after three days of testimony with seven other witnesses, many of whom spoke to conversations they’ve had with him. Those accounts place Sondland in the center of the controversy about whether Trump withheld security assistance to Ukraine and a White House meeting with the country’s new president to secure investigations into his political rivals.

New polls show impeachment hearings having minimal impact on public sentiment
One survey finds more independents oppose impeachment after first week of hearings

From left, Reps. Dean Phillips, D-Minn., Tom Malinowski, D-N.J., Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, Mark Meadows, R-N.C., and Scott Perry, R-Pa., attend Tuesday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two polls released Tuesday show the House’s impeachment hearings are having minimal impact on public sentiment, with one conducted over the weekend revealing opposition to impeachment growing among independents.

A Politico/Morning Consult poll conducted Nov. 15 to 17 after the first week of public hearings found 47 percent of respondents support the House impeaching President Donald Trump, compared to 44 percent who oppose such action.

Trump calls Pelosi ‘incompetent’ for launching impeachment inquiry
White House official says Trump ‘is expected to sign’ short-term spending bill

President Donald Trump argues at December meeting about border security with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi as Vice President Mike Pence looks on in the Oval Office. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Continuing their yearslong feud, President Donald Trump on Tuesday called Speaker Nancy Pelosi “incompetent” over House Democrats’ impeachment probe.

The president also lashed out at the media, saying their coverage of his unscheduled visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Saturday shows news outlets are “sick.” There also were indications from the president’s staff that he will not trigger another government shutdown later this week.

Stefanik seizes the spotlight at Trump impeachment proceedings
New York Republican trends on Twitter and is praised by Trump as ‘new Republican star’

New York Rep. Elise Stefanik questions former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch on Friday during a House Intelligence hearing on the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

She went out of her way to confront Adam B. Schiff

The House Intelligence Committee had gathered Friday for its second open hearing of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump when Rep. Elise Stefanik stormed into the spotlight.