Maxine Waters

Democrats pan, Republicans applaud Kraninger's tenure at CFPB
Director mum on agency's need to exist

Kraninger was unwilling to say her agency needs to exist. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At a hearing Thursday, Democrats castigated Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Kathleen Kraninger, who wasn't willing to say that her agency needs to exist. 

‘Love of the game’: Congress honors Kobe
Moment of silence lasts 33 seconds

Reps. Harley Rouda and Maxine Waters stand next to each other during Tuesday’s House floor tribute to Kobe Bryant. (Screenshot/House Recording Studio)

The House paused briefly Tuesday to honor NBA legend Kobe Bryant, who died in a helicopter crash Sunday alongside his daughter and seven others. California Reps. Maxine Waters and Harley Rouda were joined in the well of the House by 16 other members for the moment of silence, which lasted 33 seconds.

Before the remembrance, Rouda read the names of all nine people who died in a crash he called “horrific.” Those who lost their lives “were all connected by the love of the game,” he said.

Can - and should - an algorithm be ethical when it comes to financial technology?
Fintech Beat, Ep. 35

Can an algorithm be ethical? (iStock, Getty Images)

Algorithms have evolved into to powerful engines of financial technology. But they don’t always live up to the hype, as algorithmic models fail to take account of basic societal concerns like fairness, privacy and bias. Fintech Beat sits down with Michael Kearns to find out what can be done to make algorithms “ethical.”

Fintech Beat sits down with the former chief of the Federal Reserve’s open banking unit
Fintech Beat, Ep. 34

The Federal Reserve building. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Open banking’s benefits involve using customer consent to develop new financial products to revolutionize financial services. But critics claim open banking can at times bypass customer consent by using digital avatars and other online tools to infiltrate and collect customer data. Fintech Beat sits down with the former chief of the Federal Reserve’s open banking unit to get answers.

Photos of the week
The week of Dec. 16 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters as she passes the Merry Christmas, Happy New Year sign in the basement of the Capitol while leaving the House Democrats’ caucus meeting on Tuesday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Fintech Beat sits down for a one-on-one with Maxine Waters
Fintech Beat podcast, Ep. 31

House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., departs from a meeting of the House Democratic Caucus in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

House members eye high-profile impeachment assignment
Senate trial could be a career-defining moment for some ambitious Democrats

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler and Rep. Maxine Waters listen as Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff speaks during the Dec. 10 news conference to announce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The expected impeachment of President Donald Trump this week will give some lawmakers a potentially career-defining opportunity to present the House’s case against the president to the country during a Senate trial next month.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi will decide who and how many impeachment managers will travel to the other side of the Capitol to make arguments, present evidence, question witnesses and more in just the third time in U.S. history that a sitting president has been on trial before the Senate.

On impeachment, Pelosi prevailed over Judiciary panel to narrow focus
Articles filed represent latest example of how Nadler’s committee has been marginalized

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and, from left, committee leaders Jerrold Nadler, Maxine Waters and Eliot L. Engel listen as House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff speaks at a news conference Tuesday to announce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judiciary Democrats spent roughly seven months investigating a litany of allegations that President Donald Trump abused his power, but the charges laid out in the articles of impeachment unveiled Tuesday don’t reflect any of that work.

The result is the latest sign that the panel with sole jurisdiction over drafting articles of impeachment has been marginalized as its probe became overshadowed by allegations that Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate his domestic political rivals, withholding a White House meeting and congressionally appropriated security assistance as leverage.

House Judiciary to draft abuse of power, obstruction impeachment articles
Panel will consider the articles later this week, Nadler says

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and Maxine Waters, D-Calif., listen as Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks during the press conference to announce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats will bring two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, one saying he abused the power of his office and another that he obstructed Congress in its investigation of his conduct.

The Judiciary Committee plans to begin consideration of the articles, which are official charges against the president, on Thursday, and the full House is expected to vote next week. Opening statements at the Judiciary Committee will begin Wednesday night.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 10
Democrats went without impeachment article from Mueller investigation

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler announces the charges against President Donald Trump as, from left, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and chairmen Maxine Waters, Richard Neal and Adam Schiff listen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans are raising issue with the lack of an impeachment hearing with minority witnesses, as GOP members of the Judiciary Committee have repeatedly requested.

“We will avail ourselves of every parliamentary tool available to us in committees and the House floor in order to highlight your inaction,” they wrote in a letter Tuesday.