Mia Love

The Case of the Missing President — in House Debates
Candidates may want to avoid him, but election is still a referendum on Trump

The recent debate in Virginia’s 7th District between GOP Rep. Dave Brat and Democrat Abigail Spanberger revolved around both candidates taking a vow of silence regarding the president, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Judging from two House debates this week in hotly contested races on both sides of the country, you would think that the president of the United States was a shadowy, off-stage figure whose personality and politics are barely worth discussing. Even “The Invisible Man” of the 1897 H.G. Wells novel and the 1933 Claude Rains movie had more of a corporal presence than Donald Trump.

During the one-hour debate in Utah’s 4th district in suburban Salt Lake City, the word Trump was not mentioned until the 45-minute mark when the moderator blurted out the president’s name in a question on tariffs.

House GOP Incumbents Spent Hundreds of Thousands in Legal Fees to Head Off Crises
Mia Love, Scott Taylor, Chris Collins and Duncan Hunter all face competitive races

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., spent nearly $185,000 in campaign money on legal fees in the third quarter that ended Sept. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least six House Republicans combined to spend more than $325,000 in campaign funds in the most recent quarter alone on legal or crisis management fees related to brewing scandals that have wended their way into the court of public opinion — and, in some cases, real courtrooms.

New York Rep. Chris Collins, whom federal authorities indicted on Aug. 8 on 10 counts related to insider trading and securities fraud, shelled out $30,980.25 from his campaign account to the D.C.-based law firm BakerHostetler just three days later.

Mia Love Claims FEC Cleared Her — Others Say Not So Fast
Utah GOP rep raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for primary race she didn’t face

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, has been nagged by an ongoing dispute about money she raised for a primary race that never happened. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Utah Rep. Mia Love does not appear to be out of the woods just yet over a complaint filed with the Federal Election Commission over funds she raised for a GOP primary race she allegedly knew she would not have.

That’s despite Love claiming in a statement Monday night that the FEC has cleared her of any wrongdoing after she agreed to re-designate roughly $370,000 in campaign contributions made between the GOP nominating convention in April and the June primary date, when Love did not face a Republican challenger.

Flood of Money After Baseball Shooting Routed to Charities
D.C. causes to receive $700,000

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, has a word with Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., after he tagged her out at home plate during the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on June 14, 2018. The Democrats prevailed 21-5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Congressional Baseball Game has gotten so big that they had to find new ways to give away the money.

After a gunman opened fire on a Republican team practice in June 2017, a record number of fans attended the next two games. More than 17,000 tickets were sold in 2018.

Mia Love Says Democrats Attacking Her Because She’s a Black, Republican Woman
Rhetoric in race for Utah’s 4th District heating up as campaigns attack each other in ads

Utah Republican Rep. Mia Love and Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams are stepping up the personal attacks ahead of their tightly contested election for Utah's 4th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

GOP Rep. Mia Love has a theory for why the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Democratic National Committee are targeting her seat — and it’s not because her Democratic opponent, Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams, has pulled within single digits in numerous polls this summer.

It’s because, she said in an interview on Fox News radio Monday, she is black, Republican, and successful.

Mia’s Money Matters: Love Campaign to Keep Contested Funds Amid Objection
Opponent Ben McAdams says she should forfeit all the money subject to FEC inquiry

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, attends a news conference after a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on June 7, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love’s re-election campaign will hold onto much of the nearly $1.2 million her opponent says she raised improperly, shifting it to the general election from a primary that never happened, her campaign said Tuesday.

The move came as Ben McAdams, Love’s opponent in the hotly contested midterm election, demanded she forfeit all the money, which has been the subject of a Federal Elections Commission inquiry.

Rep. Mia Love’s Campaign Gamed Primary Fundraising Laws, FEC Finds
GOP congresswoman’s campaign will return or reclassify less than a third of funds called into question

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, improperly raised more than $1 million for a primary race she knew she would not have, the FEC contends. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love’s re-election campaign copped to improperly raising money for a primary race that it knew was unlikely to take place, the campaign’s lawyers wrote in a letter to the Federal Election Commission.

The GOP congresswoman’s campaign was responding to a letter from the FEC in which the commission scrutinized $1,153,624 Love raised and classified as primary election funds for her 4th District seat in Utah.

Mitt Romney to Stump for Rep. Mia Love in Utah
More than 40 elected officials to join vulnerable GOP rep on stage Friday

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, will host Senate candidate Mitt Romney at a rally Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love is getting an assist Friday from former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who will speak at Love’s campaign rally in Thanksgiving Point, Utah.

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee, won the Republican primary in June to replace retiring Sen. Orrin G. Hatch.

5 Big Things the House Is Not Doing Before August Recess
Appropriations, immigration matters and Russia response among the unaddressed issues

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a news conference with House Republican leaders on July 17. Also appearing are, from left, conference chair Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the Senate prepares to work into August, the House is set to adjourn Thursday for its annual late summer recess with some unfinished business. 

Some legislative items the House is leaving on the table are must-pass bills with looming deadlines, and others are issues members want to tackle. Here are five things the chamber will not have done before they head home for August recess: