MN-07

Collin Peterson Running for Re-Election Next Year
In neighboring Minnesota 8th District, Rick Nolan is still unsure

Rep. Collin C. Peterson, right, says he’s running for re-election in 2018 while fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan is still contemplating a gubernatorial run. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Democrat whose potential retirement gives his party the most heartburn every year, Minnesota Rep. Collin C. Peterson, is running for re-election next year.

“Yeah, I'm running. I’ve got 700 grand in the bank,” Peterson said outside the House chamber Wednesday afternoon.

NRCC Goes After Blue-Collar Districts in 2018
GOP campaign arm releases list of 36 initial targets

Rep. Tim Walz speaks with guests during a campaign event in Duluth for fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan last fall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee’s initial list of offensive targets for 2018 includes 36 Democrat-held districts, many in blue-collar areas of the country.

If Democrats are targeting the well-educated suburbs (see New Jersey’s 11th District, for example), where Donald Trump either barely won or underperformed, Republicans are going after many rural districts where Hillary Clinton underperformed the congressional ticket. 

Minnesota Blue Dog Isn't Ready to Give Up His District
Collin Peterson’s seat will almost certainly flip when he retires

Minnesota Rep. Collin C. Peterson, left, is one of the last Blue Dog Democrats in the House. Here he appears with former Vice President Walter Mondale, center, and Rep. Rick Nolanat the Nolan Annual Fish Fry on Oct. 27. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BRAINERD, Minn. ­— Collin C. Peterson is the last thing keeping Minnesota’s 7th District blue.

Democrats are always worried that the 13-term congressman is going to retire. Because if he does, his heavily agricultural district will almost certainly send a Republican to Congress.

‘14 Losers Looking for Second Chance in ‘16
A dozen House candidates hoping to turn narrow losses into future victories

Illinois Democrat Brad Schneider is running against Rep. Robert Dold to reclaim his old seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In sports and in politics, losing by a little can be harder than losing by a lot. At least a dozen 2016 candidates are hoping that their close calls in 2014 were more than a mirage of a missed opportunity.  

California Republican Paul Chabot could barely get national GOP strategists to acknowledge his existence last cycle when he lost to Democrat Pete Aguilar, 52-48 percent, in the 31st District open-seat race.