Paul D Ryan

Time Running Out in Ryan’s Quest to Overhaul Welfare Programs
Speaker returns to Jack Kemp roots as he targets SNAP and TANF

In his remaining months as speaker, Paul D. Ryan is making one last push on poverty. Above, Bishop Shirley Holloway helps Ryan unveil his plan for “A Better Way” in Anacostia in 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has spent his 20-year congressional career primarily focused on two issues, taxes and poverty. The Wisconsin Republican led a major rewrite of the tax code last year, but when he retires at the end of this term he won’t have many accomplishments to tout on poverty.

The last big win for conservatives in the so-called War on Poverty was the 1996 welfare overhaul, Ryan acknowledged on PBS’ “Firing Line” earlier this month.

Trump To Meet with House Republicans Tuesday to Sell Immigration Compromise
Votes on two measures expected

President Donald Trump is planning to meet with House Republicans Tuesday to talk about a compromise immigration bill. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump will meet with House Republicans Tuesday evening to express his support for a compromise immigration bill the chamber will vote on later in the week, according to a source familiar with the plan.

The president will head to the Capitol to meet with the House Republican Conference Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.

Bad Dad Jokes for Father’s Day
Ryan and McHenry face off with lame puns

(YouTube Screenshot)

Now we know what goes on in the Ryan and McHenry households for Father’s Day.

To mark the day, Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Rep. Patrick T. McHenry faced off across a table and traded some pretty lame dad jokes, trying to make the other laugh.

GOP Seeks Changes to Immigration Deal They Crafted
Compromise would help Dreamers, fund border wall, curb family-based visa programs

People protest outside the Capitol on Jan. 21 to call for the passage of the so-called DREAM Act. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A compromise immigration deal brokered by House Republicans this week would offer so-called Dreamers a path to citizenship, provide nearly $25 billion for President Donald Trump’s border wall and end family-based visa programs for certain relatives of U.S. citizens, according to a discussion draft of legislation circulated among lawmakers Thursday.

The discussion draft, provided to Roll Call by a staffer with knowledge of the negotiations, would create a new merit-based visa that Dreamers and other young immigrants could obtain starting six years after the bill is enacted. The visa would be available to Dreamers enrolled in the expiring Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, as well as those who are eligible but never signed up.

Ryan: No Guarantee Immigration Compromise Will Pass
Bill is still best shot at getting something into law, speaker says

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., won’t guarantee Republicans’ compromise immigration bill will pass the House. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

There is no guarantee that a compromise immigration bill House Republicans are finalizing for floor consideration next week will pass, Speaker Paul D. Ryan acknowledged Thursday.

“I’m not going to predict what the whip’s going to be,” he said when asked whether he’d bring the bill to the floor if the whip count comes up short or continue working to get more votes for it.

Analysis: Trump Trip Showed New Approach to Presidency
But lawmakers doubt future presidents will follow such a path

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un participate in a Tuesday signing ceremony during a meeting on Sentosa Island in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

First, Donald Trump remade the Republican Party in his own image. And after his double-dip of G-7 and North Korea nuclear diplomacy, it’s even more obvious he’s doing the same to the presidency.

Some congressional Democrats are worried the former reality television star’s eagerness to break with decades-old norms and traditions is soiling the office and influencing future chief executives to mirror Trump’s ways. And though a handful of Republican members publicly share those concerns, most are helping him transform the highest — and long the most revered — job in the land.

House GOP’s Fragile Immigration Deal Faces Uphill Battle
‘Hopefully, every time there’s a compromise, everyone can claim some victories’

Immigration rights activists chant during their May Day march in Washington to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's immigration policies on May 1, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans were quick to congratulate themselves Wednesday after brokering a fragile path forward on immigration legislation and avoiding — for now — a bruising civil war less than six months before the midterm elections.

“This is an effort to bring our caucus together, our conference together, on immigration,” Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin told reporters. “I’m very pleased with our members.”

Scalise to Release Memoir in November
‘Back in the Game’ will be released the week after Election Day

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., will release a memoir discussing his being shot last year. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise is set to release a memoir discussing his shooting last year.

“Back in the Game” will be released Nov. 13 through Center Street publishing.

Immigration Discharge Petition Deadline Arrives
3 remaining signatures expected to be added Tuesday, but negotiations on alternative measure to continue

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., says an immigration discharge petition will get to the required 218 signatures without an agreement on separate immigration legislation House Republicans can pass. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The immigration discharge petition signature deadline has arrived. All signs point to the petition reaching the required 218 signatures by the end of the day, but negotiations are continuing in an effort to block it from forcing a vote.

The discharge petition, led by moderate Republicans, is designed to bypass House leadership and force a floor vote on a series of controversial immigration bills to protect so-called Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. 

Two Former Lawmakers Aim for Rematch in Nevada’s 4th District
First hurdle will be Tuesday’s primaries

Former GOP Rep. Cresent Hardy is running again in Nevada’s 4th District. (D.A. Banks/CQ Roll Call file photo).

Nevada’s 4th District could host a rematch between two former one-term members of Congress. And both know what it’s like to lose.

Democrat Steven Horsford and Republican Cresent Hardy are considered the front-runners in their respective primary races Tuesday. Should they win, the general election would be a rematch of 2014, when Hardy ousted Horsford in a surprise only to lose the seat two years later.