Race

Trump’s NFL Feud Competes With Health Care, Tax Pushes
Policy agenda has to contend with fights over flag, race and First Amendment

President Donald Trump has been unrelenting in his criticism of NFL players protesting during the national anthem. (White House photo)

President Donald Trump’s feud with the NFL over players kneeling during the national anthem continued Monday, threatening to overshadow his domestic agenda as several legislative matters approach crucial milestones.

White House officials wanted to focus on policy this week, with time dedicated to health care, taxes, and a new science, technology, engineering and mathematics education initiative led by the president’s daughter and senior adviser Ivanka Trump.

Trump Shares Race-Baiting Image After Calling for Unity
Image shows him slowly covering country’s first African-American president

President Trump retweeted this image on Thursday morning, one day after calling for national unity. (Image created from screengrab)

Updated at 11:41 a.m. Less than 24 hours after calling for national unity after the racially tinged violence in Charlottesville, President Donald Trump shared an image with racial undertones with his 36.6 million Twitter followers.

The president, during an aggressive and defensive morning tweetstorm, retweeted an image playing off Monday’s eclipse showing himself and former President Barack Obama. In it, Trump’s head and torso slowly cover more and more of Obama’s until the country’s first African-American president is no longer visible.

Pelosi Joins Call for Removal of Confederate Statues From Capitol
Trump says country is being ‘ripped apart’ by removal of ‘beautiful’ monuments

Democrats are calling for the removal from the Capitol of Confederate statues, like this one of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in Statuary Hall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 12:32 p.m. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday joined a drumbeat from other Democrats, calling for the removal of Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol.

“The halls of Congress are the very heart of our democracy. The statues in the Capitol should embody our highest ideals as Americans, expressing who we are and who we aspire to be as a nation,” the California Democrat said in a statement

Trump Hits Lindsey Graham Over Alleged ‘Disgusting Lie’
Graham: President suggested ‘moral equivalency’ between KKK, Heyer

President Donald Trump speaks Tuesday about white supremacist groups and the violence in Virginia. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Updated at 9:11 a.m. Accusing Sen. Lindsey Graham of a “disgusting lie,” Donald Trump warned the South Carolina Republican voters will punish him for criticizing the president’s response to the racially tinged violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Graham in a Wednesday statement said Trump, during an impromptu press conference Tuesday, “took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist neo-Nazis and KKK members who attended the Charlottesville rally and people like Ms. [Heather] Heyer,” referring to the young woman killed in a car attack by a Nazi sympathizer.

Do Clinton, Democrats Have a ‘Cousin Pookie’ Problem?
Obama makes 11th-hour push to get African-Americans to the polls

President Barack Obama greets people as he attends a campaign rally in support of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the University of Central Florida on Oct. 28. Obama has been asking African-Americans to get out and vote. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Call it the “Cousin Pookie” vote.

When President Barack Obama pleads with African-Americans to get to the polls, he often invokes a fictitious family couch-dweller who’s more inclined to watch football than ever cast a ballot. And evidence suggests “Pookie” isn’t very fired up this year, creating angst for Democrats up and down the ballot.

White House Sees Opportunity in Trump's Pitch to African-Americans
Obama spokesman: GOP nominee's tax plan hurts "everyone" but the rich

Colorado Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Darryl Glenn spoke to a mostly white audience at the  2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump is trying to reach out to African-American voters.  (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The White House appears to sense an opportunity in Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s recent outreach to African-Americans.

Speaking in Michigan on Friday, Trump made a pitch for black voters to support him in November. "You're living in poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58 percent of your youth is unemployed,” Trump said.

Conservatives Must Reject White Identity Politics
The political left pushed whites to take stock of their whiteness

A while back, a friend from Pakistan asked me why whites allow other races to make fun of them in the media. I don’t remember what provoked this discussion, but I explained the importance of being able to laugh at oneself, the fact that successful and confident people — speaking aspirationally of myself, not whites in general — should not be so thin-skinned or defensive or eager to play the victim, and that, besides, skin color is not the primary way I define myself.  

“You should not let them do that,” he said. “It makes you look weak.”  

U.S. to Seek Death Penalty in South Carolina Mass Shooting
Dylann Roof is charged in the shooting of nine Africian-Americans at Bible study

Dylann Roof is charged in the killings of nine black parishioners during a Bible study last year in South Carolina. (Photo by Grace Beahm-Pool/Getty Images)

The Justice Department will seek the death penalty for Dylann Roof, the suspect in a mass shooting at a South Carolina church last year that prosecutors allege was racially motivated.  

Roof, 22, who is white, allegedly opened fire at a Bible study last June 17 in Charleston, killing nine black parishioners at the Emanuel AME Church.  

Life Before and After Getting Tossed from Trump Rally
'When you've met one Muslim, you've met one Muslim'

Rose Hamid, who was ejected from a Trump rally. (Photo by Mary C. Curtis.)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- On a recent afternoon, Rose Hamid sat at a table at one of the busiest business intersections in the city’s center, sharing information about her faith and handing out copies of the Koran in English and Spanish.

Hamid, president of Muslim Women of the Carolinas, finds peace living in the so-called Bible belt. “Charlotte is a city where people are strong in their faith,” she said.  “That’s something that’s comforting for me.”