Ron Kind

A Gun Rights Vote Only the GOP Base Can Appreciate
Expansion of concealed carry permission will die in the Senate, but the NRA really wanted the vote

Majority Whip John Cornyn has some doubts that he can get a bill passed that would improve background checks for gun purchasers but doesn’t make it easier for gun owners to carry concealed weapons across state lines. A House bill passed Wednesday would do both. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One government shutdown may be narrowly averted, but another looms right around the corner. The stain of sexual misconduct at the Capitol continues to spread, and an alleged child predator is days away from possibly joining the Senate. Middle East destabilization seems assured as Congress gets its wish to move the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. Public support dwindles daily for a loophole-encrusted, deficit-busting tax package that would be the year’s biggest legislative achievement. The push for presidential impeachment has gone far enough to necessitate procedural pushback in the House.

A week such as this one — already chockablock with headlines touching the Hill — seemed to the Republicans who run the place like an ideal time for making a bold hiding-in-plain-sight move.

Are Trump, GOP on Same Page on Bipartisan Outreach?
Tax overhaul, debt ceiling could test overtures

President Donald Trump met with Republican and Democratic members of the House Ways and Means Committee in the White House on Tuesday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is reaching out to Democrats as his party struggles to deliver on key legislation, but rather than embrace that strategy, congressional Republicans keep returning to the same playbook that has failed to give their team a win.

Fresh off another Senate failure to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, Republicans are moving from one partisan plan to the next. On Wednesday, Trump and GOP congressional leaders will unveil a framework for overhauling the tax code, a measure they plan to advance using the budget reconciliation process.

Word on the Hill: Pink-Haired Sánchez
GOP digital challenge, staff kickball tournament for Harvey & LOC departure

Rep. Linda T. Sanchez, D-Calif., speaks as Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., and Rep. Gwen Moore, D-Wisc., look on as House Democrats hold a news conference on DREAMers and to speak out against President Donald Trump’’s decision to end DACA. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Pink hair, don’t care.

Rep. Linda T. Sánchez, D-Calif., returned to work after the August recess with the bottom of her hair dyed pink.

Word on the Hill: D.C. and Guns
Save the date for Dine Out Day

Cherry blossoms were covered with ice on the East Front of the Capitol after snow and freezing rain fell over the region on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With gun sales on the decline in the U.S. since President Donald Trump took office, WalletHub conducted a study to find out which states were the most dependent on the gun industry.

The District of Columbia topped the list for highest average wages and benefits in the firearms industry at $348,325. That’s more than 10 times higher than New Mexico, which came in last at $34,232.

Amid Liberal Protests, More Democrats Holding Town Halls This Presidents Day Recess
Republicans have held more than Democrats in recent years

Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden plans to hold nine town hall meetings during the Presidents Day recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated on Feb. 21, 5:18 p.m. | Despite increased reports of liberal demonstrators disrupting Republican town halls, more lawmakers than usual are planning to meet with their constituents, including Republicans, according to CQ Roll Call data.

Democrats, especially, seem happier than usual to open themselves up this year.

Bipartisan Group Eyes Tax Overhaul for Anti-Poverty Push
Lawmakers renew push for the "Investing in Opportunity Act"

Sen. Tim Scott is part of the bipartisan group pushing for the “Investment in Opportunity Act.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A bipartisan group of lawmakers is hoping its anti-poverty legislation will become law this year as part of a broader push for a tax overhaul.

“We are teed up for success in this Congress,” Sen. Tim Scott said. “The realistic opportunity for tax reform was not last Congress. It’s this Congress.”

Ryan Re-Elected Speaker With Only 1 GOP Defection
Four Democrats voted for someone other than Pelosi

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 

 

Shaping Rules of Globalization Rather Than Allowing It to Be Done to Us
New Democrats seek to expand middle class, be a check against Trump’s darker impulses

Wisconsin Rep. Ron Kind says the New Democrat Coalition “will be pragmatic partners for the president as long as he is willing to work with Congress to implement policy solutions that will work for everyone.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One thing people made abundantly clear during the election this year is that far too many hardworking people are not feeling the positive effects of the economic recovery. That needs to change. The current economy is not the one I grew up in and certainly not the one my grandchildren will grow up in. We need to help lead for the economy of the future, not the economy of fifty years ago. We need to do more now to prepare future generations of Americans to be full participants in this global economy.

Globalization and digitization have transformed where and how jobs are created, and as lawmakers, we need to rethink infrastructure, regulations, the tax code and export policy to best enable private-sector job creation. The New Democrat Coalition, a group of 52 pro-growth Democrats in the House of Representatives, is working to ensure that Americans can compete in our global economy. From Silicon Valley to rural Wisconsin to the city centers of the East Coast, we must come together after the grueling campaign and find constructive issues we can work on to help Americans across the nation.

Himes Elected Chairman of New Democrat Coalition
Polis elected vice chairman, along with DelBene, Kilmer, Sewell

Connecticut Rep. Jim Himes was elected chairman of the New Democrat Coalition on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The New Democrat Coalition on Thursday elected Connecticut Rep. Jim Himes as its chairman for the 115th Congress. 

Himes, 50, beat Colorado Rep. Jared Polis, 41, for the top spot in the moderate caucus. Virginia Rep. Gerald E. Connolly, 66, dropped out of the race before the vote, saying he thought it would help diffuse some of the tension arising from a three-way race. 

Tax Software Companies Push IRS Free-Filing Bill
Consumer advocates have privacy concerns

Rep. Ron Kind wants to make free online tax preparation permanent for lower-income filers. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Just in time for Tax Day, House lawmakers this week will unveil a plan that would make permanent an Internal Revenue Service program that provides free, online tax preparation for low- and middle-income Americans.  

It's the kind of effort that consumer advocates would cheer, in theory. But privacy and other concerns surrounding the 13-year-old Free File program have winnowed the list of supporters and ceded the lobbying push to companies such as TurboTax maker Intuit and H&R Block that provide the software and electronic filing services at no cost.