Ryan Zinke

Kathleen Williams Wins Democratic Nod to Challenge Gianforte in Montana
Gianforte is running for his first full term after winning special election last year

Kathleen Williams won the Democratic nod to challenge GOP Rep. Greg Gianforte, above, in Montana. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former state Rep. Kathleen Williams won the Democratic nomination for Montana’s at-large House seat Tuesday.

Williams will take on Republican Rep. Greg Gianforte, who’s running for his first full term in November after being elected in a May 2017 special election

Matt Rosendale Wins Montana GOP Senate Primary
Rosendale will take on Democratic incumbent Jon Tester in November

Montana state Auditor Matt Rosendale won the GOP nomination for Senate on Tuesday. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

State Auditor Matt Rosendale won the GOP nomination Tuesday night to take on Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester in November. 

With 96 percent of precincts reporting, Rosendale led a four-way field with 34 percent of the vote, according to The Associated Press. Former district judge Russ Fagg was in second place with 29 percent. Fagg ran with the support of many former Montana elected officials, including ex-Reps. Rick Hill and Denny Rehberg and three former governors.

Trump Uses Flags, Military Troops to Make a Political Point
Sens. Booker, Kaine among critics worried about president's recent actions

President Donald Trump speaks at a "Celebration of America" event at the White House that replaced an event with the NFL Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles and returned to one of his favorite topics: the national anthem. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday brought his feud with the NFL and some of its players over national anthem protests to his backdoor — literally. And that’s when something rare happened that shows just how polarizing his presidency and the racially tinged anthem debate has been.

A sitting president of the United States, flanked by Army and Marine Corps personnel, was heckled while standing just steps from the Oval Office.

A Sleepy Senate Primary Heats Up in Montana
Outside spending intensifies battle between Rosendale and Fagg

Former judge Russ Fagg is seeking the GOP nomination for Senate in Montana. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The next big Republican Senate primary is in Montana, where voters will choose Democratic Sen. Jon Tester’s opponent on Tuesday.

The GOP contest in Big Sky Country was a sleepy affair for much of this year, lacking the verbal ax throwing that animated similar contests in Indiana and West Virginia this spring.

Florida Delegation Playing Hardball to Extend Offshore Drilling Moratorium
Sunshine State Democrats and Republicans may target NDAA

Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., says he doesn’t see “any light between Republicans and Democrats” on the issue of offshore drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Emboldened by a Defense Department report that expressed worries about unfettered offshore drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, Florida’s House delegation is preparing to throw its weight around to win a multiyear extension of a moratorium off its coasts.

The bipartisan commitment from the third largest congressional delegation, reached last week, may affect the $708.1 billion defense authorization bill that is being considered by the Rules Committee Monday and Tuesday ahead of a vote as soon as Wednesday.

Alexander Says National Parks Bill ‘Most Important’ In Decades
Bill would use energy permit revenue to fund backlog of maintenance projects

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., redoubled his efforts this week to pass the National Parks Restoration Act to address the National Parks maintenance backlog. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Lamar Alexander and other lawmakers see an avenue to enact the “most important piece of legislation for national parks in decades,” the Tennessee Republican said Tuesday.

In March, a bipartisan group of senators and House members introduced legislation to fund nearly $7 billion in national parks maintenance projects that have been on hold for years.

Whitehouse: EPA’s Pruitt Took Security Detail to Rose Bowl, Disneyland
New information raises more questions about Trump administration officials’ spending of taxpayer money

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse wants to know why “significant agency resources are being devoted to administrator [Scott] Pruitt’s ’round-the-clock security, even when he is traveling on non-official business.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has used EPA-funded security for personal trips, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse wrote in a letter to the agency’s inspector general.

Pruitt took his security detail with him to his home in Tulsa, Oklahoma; a family vacation at Disneyland in California; and the 2018 Rose Bowl game, Whitehouse wrote in the letter obtained by CNN.

Gowdy’s Oversight Panel Knocking On Interior’s Pricey Doors
Committee wants answers about $139,000 doors, in latest showdown over spending by Trump’s Cabinet officials

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke prepares to testify at a Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing on March 13. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s $139,000 replacement doors have earned him a trip to the principal’s office.

In a letter dated March 22, House Oversight Chairman Trey Gowdy requested a briefing from Zinke following news reports surrounding the procurement of replacement doors for his office at the Interior Department.

Whitehouse Preps 200th Climate Speech, Hoping Senate Will Stir
“It is an indicator of the extent [to] which the fossil fuel industry owns the joint”

Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse speaks with Roll Call in his office on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Every week of every Senate session for the last six years, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse has taken to the floor to urge his colleagues to “wake up” to the dire consequences of their inaction on climate change.

But the slumbering chamber keeps hitting the snooze button.

Supreme Court Backs Congressional Power to Affect Lawsuits
Chief Justice Roberts, Gorsuch dissent in the decision

The Supreme Court ruled that Congress did not overstep into the power of federal courts. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A divided Supreme Court on Tuesday backed the power of Congress to pass legislation that would affect ongoing litigation, ruling that a law about Michigan land and its use as a Native American casino did not violate the Constitution.

In a 6-3 opinion, the court found that Congress did not overstep into the power of federal courts with a law to end a lengthy court battle over the Interior Department’s decision to take that tract into trust for the Gun Lake Tribe of Pottawatomi Indians.