SCOTUS

Podcast: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Unlikely Pop Icon
Political Theater, Episode 17

Ginsburg at President Barack Obama's State of the Union address in the Capitol on Jan. 20, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a bona fide pop icon, perhaps strange territory for an 85-year-old, diminutive, reserved constitutional scholar. In the latest Political Theater podcast, filmmakers Betsy West and Julie Cohen speak about their documentary, “RBG,” including what it was like to be in the same theater when Ginsburg saw their movie at the Sundance Film Festival. The documentary opens in theaters on May 4.

Podcast: High Court to Weigh In on Gay Rights, Redistricting and Immigration
The Week Ahead, Episode 72

Members of the US Supreme Court are photographed on Thursday. (Rex Features via AP Images)

CQ legal affairs writer Todd Ruger drills down on the cases before the Supreme Court this new term and the justices who may tip the scales.

Show Notes:

Capitol Ink | Senate Home Opener

Ep. 47: How the Senate Risks Losing Its Essence Over Gorsuch
The Big Story
Capitol Ink | Gorsuch On Ice

Who is Judge Neil Gorsuch?
 

Nearly a year after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, President Donald Trump announced Tuesday the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill Scalia’s seat on the bench. Roll Call gives a quick look at some facts about the conservative Colorado judge.

White House Watch: Presidential Campaigning, High Court Blockade
 

Ep. 24: Justice Breyer's Pivotal Role
The Week Ahead

The Supreme Court begins its new term with several hot-button issues to consider, says CQ Roll Call's Legal Affairs writer Todd Ruger. A justice to watch is Stephen Breyer, who could play a pivotal role on the short-handed court in deciding transgender bathroom rights, redistricting and how it affects voting and immigration law. Show Notes:

Roll Call Columnists on SCOTUS Abortion, McDonnell Decisions
'Where's the consistency, people?'

Pro-choice demonstrators at the U.S. Supreme Court cheer on Monday as they learn the court struck down a Texas abortion law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

What we've seen from federal courts lately is a distaste with the way government prosecutors pursue corruption cases against high-ranking public officials, from the late Sen. Ted Stevens to Gov. Bob McDonnell. I'm not the first to say this, but scandalous behavior and criminal activity are not one and the same. Often, the scandalous aspect of a public official's action is that distasteful things are technically legal. It's important that the court clarified a definition of what constitutes a quid pro quo exchange.  

[ Supreme Court Overturns McDonnell's Bribery Conviction ]