Senate Intelligence Committee

Watch: Schumer asks for resolution on the "Ukraine whistleblower"

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to reporters during a news conference at the Capitol on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer asked his Senate colleagues to pass a resolution requesting the whistleblower complaint be transmitted to the Select Committee on Intelligence in the Senate and the House Intelligence Committee.

Flashback: Here’s what Comey said about the Trump memos during his 2017 testimony
DOJ watchdog says Comey violated FBI policies, but won't be prosecuted

Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election on June 8, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senators want help securing the personal phones of members and staff
The proposal would allow the Sergeant-at-Arms to provide “voluntary cybersecurity assistance” to lawmakers, some staff

Senators Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Tom Cotton, R-Ark., want the the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms to help secure personal devices of members and staff against cyber threats. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two Senate Intelligence Committee members introduced a bill Wednesday to protect both personal electronic devices and Senate accounts of members and staff from cybersecurity vulnerabilities and threats. 

The proposal from Democratic Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Arkansas Republican Tom Cotton would allow the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms to provide “voluntary cybersecurity assistance” to lawmakers and certain Senate staff to secure accounts and personal devices.

These lawmakers want to know when the Senate gets hacked
The bipartisan duo of Sens. Wyden and Cotton called for more disclosure of Senate cyber attacks

Senators Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Tom Cotton, R-Ark., called on Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger to reveal cyber attacks against the Senate. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A bipartisan Senate duo wants to know about any successful hacks of Senate devices and networks.

Democratic Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Arkansas Republican Tom Cotton wrote to Senate Sargent of Arms Michael Stenger calling for an annual report on when Senate computers and smartphones have been compromised, and when hackers have otherwise gained access to sensitive Senate data.

Senators Urge No Prison Time for Intelligence Committee Aide Who Lied to FBI
Prosecutors, on other hand, recommend two years in prison for James Wolfe

Senators urged leniency for former Senate Intelligence Committee James Wolfe, who lied to the FBI. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

While federal prosecutors on Tuesday recommended a two-year prison sentence for James Wolfe, a former director of security for the Senate Intelligence Committee who pleaded guilty in October to a charge he lied to the FBI about his contacts with journalists, his former bosses urged the judge to show mercy. 

A letter to the judge from current committee Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina, top Democrat Mark Warner of Virginia, and former chairwoman Dianne Feinstein of California urged no prison time for Wolfe, who was director of security for nearly three decades.

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