sexual harassment

Hoyer Fine With Cárdenas Remaining in Leadership While Abuse Allegations Investigated
Democratic whip says his view would be different if Cárdenas were in a role where he spoke for the party

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., are not calling on Rep. Tony Cardenas to step down from his leadership position amid child sex abuse allegations raised against him that he denies. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer does not believe that Tony Cárdenas needs to step down from his leadership role over allegations that he sexually abused a 16-year-old girl in 2007 when he was serving on the Los Angeles City Council.

Cárdenas, who has denied the allegations raised against him in a lawsuit filed last month, serves in an elected leadership position House Democrats created in 2016 for a member serving for five terms or less to have a seat at the leadership table. The California Democrat is the highest-ranking lawmaker to be accused of sexual misconduct to date.

Cárdenas, Member of Democratic Leadership, Denies Allegations of Child Sex Abuse
California congressman admits he’s unnamed defendant in lawsuit

Rep. Tony Cárdenas, D-Calif., has denied allegations of child sex abuse raised in a lawsuit filed last week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

California Rep. Tony Cárdenas, a junior member of Democratic leadership, is denying through a lawyer allegations of child sex abuse raised in a lawsuit filed last week in Los Angeles County. 

The lawsuit did not name Cárdenas, describing the defendant, John Doe, as “an elected politician in Los Angeles County.” California law prevents the naming of the defendant in court filings for civil cases involving child sex abuse “until there has been a showing of corroborative fact as to the charging allegations against that defendant.”

Rep. Pat Meehan to Resign Over Sexual Misconduct Probe
Pa. Republican had already said he wasn’t running for re-election

Rep. Patrick Meehan, R-Pa., was accused of sexual harassment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Patrick Meehan announced Friday that he is resigning from Congress to end the Ethics Committee’s investigation into allegations he sexually harassed a former staffer.

The Pennsylvania Republican said he intends to repay the $39,000 in taxpayer dollars used to settle the harassment case with the staffer within the next 30 days. He had already announced he would not run for re-election following the allegations.

Watch: Farenthold Resigns from Congress
 

Farenthold Resigns After Sexual Harassment Scandal
Texas Republican’s resignation takes effect Friday

Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, resigned Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Texas GOP Rep. Blake Farenthold resigned Friday, roughly four months after news broke that he had settled a sexual harassment lawsuit with taxpayer money.

“While I planned on serving out the remainder of my term in Congress, I know in my heart it’s time for me to move along and look for new ways to serve,” Farenthold said in a statement Friday. He said he sent a letter to GOP Gov. Greg Abbott resigning his position effective 5 p.m. Friday.

Paul Ryan Yields to Trump on High-Profile Issues
Speaker hedges on omnibus, sexual harassment, tariffs

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., closes the door as he prepares to hold a press conference following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday. Also pictured, from left, are Rep. Don Bacon, R-Neb., Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan laughed Tuesday when a reporter asked him if he thinks President Donald Trump should stop attacking special counsel Robert S. Mueller III. 

“The special counsel should be free to follow through with his investigation to its completion without interference, absolutely,” Ryan said. “I am confident that he’ll be able to do that. I’ve received assurances that his firing is not even under consideration.”

Candidates to Watch in Arizona’s Special Election Primaries
 

Critics Point to Problems With Sexual Harassment Bill
Measure is intended to create more protections for Hill staffers

People rally against sexual harassment outside Trump International Hotel on Dec. 9 in New York City. (Stephanie Keith/Getty Images file photo)

A bipartisan measure meant to increase protections for congressional employees who complain of sexual harassment and other workplace discrimination could make the process more cumbersome and less transparent, experts on employment law and advocates for victims and government transparency said this week.

Critics agree that the 23-year-old Congressional Accountability Act is long overdue for reform. But they said this one — expected to get broad support when it comes before the House as early as next week — could introduce more problems than it solves, possibly because it was compiled in a rush to respond to the #MeToo movement and the resulting wave of sexual harassment allegations in American institutions.

House Harassment Bill on Fast Track, but Maybe Moving Too Fast?