Sherrod Brown

Democrats Notching Key Legislative Victories Ahead of Elections
Members hope achievements can drive support among voters in rural states

Montana Sen. Jon Tester, is one of several moderate Democrats in the chamber who have notched key legislative victories under President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Moderate Senate Democrats on the ballot in 2018 are racking up a number of key legislative victories in advance of what is expected to be a bitter midterm election cycle.

The successes, on bills ranging from veterans’ issues to bank regulation and tax credits for so-called clean coal technology, are the kind that can drive support among voters in the rural states that many of these members call home.

Senate Passes Bank Deregulation Bill, House May Seek Additions
More than a dozen Democratic senators joined all Republicans

Senate Banking Chairman Michael D. Crapo sponsored the measure that would ease regulations on all but the biggest banks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate voted Wednesday to pass a bill that would be the biggest bank deregulation since 1999 and would roll back parts of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial overhaul.

More than a dozen Democrats joined the Republicans to pass the bill, sending it to the House, where conservative Republicans may seek to attach further provisions to roll back the 2010 law. Republicans will be trying to straddle the line between the extensive reversal of bank regulation that they seek and keeping on board the Senate Democrats who will be needed to clear the measure.

Opinion: The Quatorze Quotient — The Importance of 14 Years in Big-Time Politics
If would-be presidents haven’t made their mark by then, they could be seen as shopworn

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., is among the politicians for whom the “14-Year Rule” for presidential prospects may apply , Walter Shapiro writes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For those trying to get a jump on handicapping the 2032 presidential race (and, frankly, who isn’t?), a smart move would be to take a close look at the candidates who will be elected for the first time to Congress (or as governor) this November.

It all comes down to political numerology and the lasting importance of a 14-year gap.

Fed Chairman Weighs in on Financial Deregulation Bill Set for Senate Debate
Senate set to consider measure on the floor next week

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell made his first appearances as head of the central bank before Congress this week.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell used his first appearance before the Senate Banking Committee to endorse the main features of a financial deregulation bill that the Senate is set to debate on the floor next week. 

Powell told the panel Thursday that the “most significant” provision in the bill is the replacement of the Dodd-Frank threshold for stringent Fed regulation of banks. The 2010 Dodd-Frank law put the threshold at $50 billion in assets. The bill would raise that to $250 billion, and reduce the number of banks effected from 44 to 13.

Opinion: What Matters About the Wealth of Congress
How much is too much?

Political figures like Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, are more comfortable talking about their humble roots than their current wealth, Walter Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last November, as the Senate Finance Committee debated the tax bill, partisan talking points degenerated into a shouting match between chairman Orrin Hatch and Ohio Democrat Sherrod Brown.

The 83-year-old Hatch, who is retiring at the end of this year, huffed, “I come from the poor people ... and I resent anybody who says I’m doing this for the rich.” Hatch added, “I come from the lower middle class originally. We didn’t have anything, so don’t spew that stuff at me.”

Senate Banking Panel Advances Fed, Two Other Financial Nominees
Economics professor Marvin Goodfriend endorsed for Federal Reserve Board

The Senate Banking Committee has narrowly endorsed the nomination of Marvin Goodfriend to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Banking Committee narrowly endorsed Thursday the nomination of Marvin Goodfriend to the Federal Reserve Board as Democrats complained that the economics professor is more focused on fighting inflation than creating jobs.

Goodfriend faced opposition from Democrats because of what they described as a lack of commitment to the Fed’s goal of supporting maximum employment. His nomination advanced on a party-line vote of 13-12.

Latest Wells Fargo Penalties Add Fuel to Dodd-Frank Debate
Democrats fret that banks will get off easy under new Federal Reserve leadership

Sen. Sherrod Brown frets that the new leadership at the Federal Reserve will favor lightening restrictions on banks that have defrauded their customers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats are praising former Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen’s actions against Wells Fargo & Co. and questioning whether the Fed will continue to be as tough now that she has left the central bank.

The Fed’s cease-and-desist order released Friday evening, on Yellen’s final day as chairwoman, restricts the nation’s third-largest bank to the $1.95 trillion in total consolidated assets it had at the end of 2017, a move the company estimates will cut its earnings this year by between $300 million and $400 million. The company had a net income of $22.2 billion in 2017.

Trump Whips Out the ‘T’ Word in Ohio
President's charge of treason fails to come close to Constitutional standard

President Donald Trump said in Ohio on Monday that Democrats committed treason when they did not applaud his State of the Union address. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Monday labeled Democrats “treasonous” for their reactions to his State of the Union address and said he looks forward to running against them in 2018 and 2020. His allegation, however, fails to meet the Constitution’s standard for that major crime.

During an official event obstensibly about the GOP tax law at a cylinder factory in Ohio, Trump called congressional Democrats “treasonous” for not applauding during his State of the Union address last Tuesday night.

Senate Democrats Ask Why Trump Let Russian Spy Chief Into United States
Also question Treasury secretary on Russia sanctions implementation

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, pressed Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin about Russian sanctions Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Leading Senate Democrats want to know why the Trump administration allowed a top Russian spy onto U.S. soil.

Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer led other Democrats in raising concerns Tuesday about a reported visit by Sergey Naryshkin, Russia's foreign spy chief and an ally of President Vladimir Putin.

Republicans Prepare for Upcoming Abortion Vote
Votes not likely there in Senate, but measure could be a midterm issue

Oklahoma Sen. James Lankford is among the proponents of the legislation to ban late-term abortions. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans are readying for a vote next week on a late-term abortion bill. And while it’s unlikely they will have the votes to pass it, abortion opponents say the measure could play a role in the 2018 midterm elections.

The bill would ban abortions after the 20-week mark, while providing exceptions for rape, incest or the endangerment of a woman. It passed the House along party lines last year and has been waiting on a Senate vote.