south carolina

Does successful prostate surgery mean Sen. Michael Bennet will join the 2020 field?
Colorado Democrat had been planning presidential run before cancer diagnosis

Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., recently underwent successful prostate cancer surgery. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Colorado Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet’s prostate cancer surgery was successful.

“Last weekend, Michael underwent surgery and is recovering at his home in Colorado. His doctors report the surgery was completely successful and he requires no further treatment. Michael and his family deeply appreciate the well wishes and support from Coloradans and others across the country, and he looks forward to returning to work after the recess,” spokeswoman Courtney Gidner said in a statement.

For serious primary voters, the parade of Democratic candidates is no joke
The contender clown car may be overflowing, but voters definitely aren’t laughing

There are too many Democratic presidential contenders to count, but primary voters aren’t throwing in the towel just yet, Curtis writes. When Beto O’Rourke made his Southern swing last weekend, supporters took the time to explain why he stands out from the field. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The number of Democratic hopefuls declaring, thinking about declaring or being pushed to declare their interest in the 2020 race is increasing so rapidly, it has already become a reliable punchline. But for voters looking to discover the person who offers sensible policies on the issues they care about while exuding the intangible “it” quality that could beat Donald Trump, it is serious business.

Forget about what magic the letter “B” might hold — think Bernie, Biden, Beto, Booker, Buttigieg and I know I’m forgetting someone, oh yes, Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet — these voters are digging deeper on the candidates who will crowd a debate stage in Miami two nights in a row in June.

When Fritz Hollings ‘made the turn’ as a Southern politician
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 66

Ernest "Fritz" Hollings, then-governor of South Carolina, campaigns with John Kennedy during the 1960 presidential campaign and helped JFK win South Carolina and six other southern states. Before he left office, Hollings would reverse himself on segregation and call for integration. He went on to serve in the Senate from 1966 until 2005. (CQ Roll Call file photo).

Before the late Sen. Ernest “Fritz” Hollings was elected to what would become a distinguished congressional career, the South Carolina Democrat reversed himself on the defining issue in Southern politics: segregation. 

Running for governor in 1958, Hollings opposed integration, a keystone battle in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision desegregating public schools. But by the end of his term, he said it was time for the South to change, taking a step out of line with many of his Democratic colleagues in the region. 

Joe Biden eulogizes the ‘constantly evolving’ Fritz Hollings as he looks toward 2020
Potential presidential hopeful visited the Citadel on Tuesday to bid farewell to another Senate friend

Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, D-S.C., endorsed Jesse Jackson for president in 1988. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Joseph R. Biden Jr. mulls another run for the White House, the former vice president traveled to South Carolina to fulfill a duty that underscores his ties to a bygone era.

Biden, the most prolific eulogist in American politics, found himself in another house of worship Tuesday morning, bidding farewell to another former Senate colleague, South Carolina’s Ernest F. Hollings, a Southern Democrat who once advocated segregation but later honored a judge who fought it.

There’s one problem with Trump’s call for Congress to act fast on immigration
Trump ally Sen. Graham made clear Sunday his effort to find a deal is in early stages

President Donald Trump waves as he walks with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi to his motorcade at the Capitol after the annual Friends of Ireland Luncheon in March 14. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump wants Congress to end its April recess before it’s even really started to work on an immigration overhaul bill.

There’s only one problem: One of his closest Senate allies made clear the only bill in town isn’t ready yet.

Mitch McConnell says Senate Republicans are ‘determined not to lose women’ in 2020
Senate majority leader talks about having GOP senators run their own campaigns

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., does not think the Senate GOP will be wiped out by suburban voters in 2020. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says Republican senators on the ballot in 2020 can attract support from suburban voters, especially women, by portraying themselves as a firewall against Democratic policies. 

“We all know why it happened,” the Kentucky Republican said of the electoral shifts that enabled Democrats to win control of the House in 2018. “We got crushed in the suburbs. We lost college graduates and women in the suburbs, which led in the House to losses in suburban Kansas City, Oklahoma City, Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Charleston, South Carolina, Philadelphia.”

Trump accuses Dems of ‘treason’ even as Mulvaney seeks a border deal with them
‘No one views the White House as credible on this issue,’ says senior House Democratic source

American and Mexican flag fly over the Paso del Norte International Bridge on March 30 in El Paso, Texas. President Donald Trump continues accusing Democrats of "treason" over their border policies. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump continues accusing congressional Democrats of treason — a crime punishable by death — over their border security policies even as his acting chief of staff was on Capitol Hill Wednesday seeking a deal.

And a senior Democratic aide expressed doubt that a deal is likely over what promises to be among 2020’s most contentious campaign trail issues.

Did you say ‘spying?’ Barr walks back testimony after making a stir
Barr clears up his Senate testimony after cable news and social media buzz over one of his word choices

Attorney General William Barr testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing on Tuesday. Lee J. Lofthus, assistant attorney general for administration, appears at left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General William Barr sought to “please add one point of clarification” at the end of his testimony Wednesday before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee — and the veteran law enforcement official needed it.

Cable news and social media were abuzz with one of Barr’s earlier word choices, when he told senators that he would look into the work of U.S. intelligence agencies directed at the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election because “spying did occur.”

What if Trump-Haley deadlocks with Buttigieg-Biden in 2020? Anything’s possible
Enough strange things have happened politically that it‘s wise to prepare for them

In the 2020 election, voters should get ready for the the unthinkable. It's happened enough in recent years that almost nothing can be counted out. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Hanging chads and an election decided by the United States Supreme Court (2000). The election of the first black president (2008). Sarah Palin (2008). The 2010 midterm tsunami (Republicans gain 63 House seats). The nomination of the first woman for president by a major party (2016). The election of Donald Trump (2016). Russian bots interfering in the election (2016). The realignment of white men without a college degree (2016). The realignment of white, college-educated women (2018). Lose the popular vote, win the Electoral College — twice (2000, 2016).

The political world has been turned on its head more than once over the last two decades. The uncommon becomes ordinary. The bizarre, commonplace. Why should it stop now?

Ernest ‘Fritz’ Hollings, South Carolina senator and WWII veteran, has died
Longtime statesman known for his quick wit died Saturday at the age of 97

During an interview in his office in 1993, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, D-S.C., looks at a photo of himself with Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. (Scott Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ernest Frederick “Fritz” Hollings, a longtime statesman with a rumbling baritone known for a quick wit and as a champion of environmental and social policy, has died at the age of 97.

The South Carolina Democrat, who ran for president in 1984 and served in the Senate for nearly 40 years — most of his tenure as the junior senator to Republican Strom Thurmond — died Saturday after a period of failing health, The (Charleston) Post and Courier reported