Steny H Hoyer

Stanley Cup Finally Gets Its D.C. Day in the Capitol
Washington hockey fans make the most of their first ever NHL championship

A Capitol Police officer takes a selfie with the NHL's Stanley Cup in the Capitol on Wednesday. The Cup, which was won by the Washington Capitals in June, made a few stops on the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

When the Stanley Cup was in the Capitol, true Washington Capitals fans stood apart from other hockey fans taking a quick break from their jobs during a recess day to see the famous trophy.

Many were wearing their allegiance on their chest.

Why Pelosi Is Likely to Be Speaker Again if Democrats Win Back House
There’s no obvious field of candidates ready to challenge her

It’s hard to see Nancy Pelosi stepping down if the Democrats take back the House next month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — “You can’t beat somebody with nobody.”

That political axiom explains in just six words why Nancy Pelosi is likely to be elected speaker if Democrats retake the House in November. No one has announced plans to challenge the California Democrat, and it’s unclear if anyone will after the election.

Trump Keeps Rosenstein Despite Reported Recording, Removal Talk
‘I have a very good relationship’ with deputy AG, president says

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves the Capitol on May 19, 2017. He is still in his job despite reported remarks about secretly recording President Trump with the goal of removing him from office. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rod Rosenstein, despite reports he discussed secretly taping President Donald Trump with the goal or removing him from office, is still the deputy attorney general after the two men spoke aboard Air Force One.

The senior Justice Department official joined Trump on the executive jet on the way to Orlando, where the president is addressing law enforcement officials. White House spokesman Hogan Gidley told reporters traveling with Trump that the duo talked for 30 minutes during the flight to Florida.

At the Races: The 10 Most Vulnerable Incumbents
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone Pathé, Bridget Bowman and Stephanie Akin

Steny Hoyer's Election Night Watch List
Minority whip has a dozen races he says he will focus on for early hints

Steny Hoyer will be watching 12 races on election night. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Steny H. Hoyer has high hopes that Democrats will take back control of the House in November and he’s trekked to 94 districts in 22 states and campaigned for 75 candidates and 37 incumbents this cycle to try and make it happen. And of those races, on Nov. 6th, there are 12 races he says he’ll be watching.

The House minority whip called five East Coast races in particular “bellwethers.” The returns will be in relatively early and they are just a few of the seats that Democrats are trying to snag from Republican control:

Trump Praises NAFTA 2.0, But Concerned Congress Will Determine Fate
With calendar tight and elections looming, several factors in play for approval

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his government signed on to a new version of the North American Free Trade Agreement on Sunday, but Congress will ultimately determine the fate of the deal. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 2:01 p.m.President Donald Trump on Monday hailed a trade pact that could replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, but the fate of the deal is soon to pass into the hands of Congress, and lawmakers have their own concerns.

And a top author of the deal says there is no major flaw to prevent Democrats from supporting it.

Domestic Battles Overtake Trump’s Third Day With Foreign Leaders
Trump in fighting mood as Thursday could shape his presidency

President Donald Trump leaves after chairing a United Nations Security Council meeting Wednesday. He sparred with attorney Michael Avenatti most of the day. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

No one laughed on Wednesday.

But there was plenty of anger, accusations and acrimony during President Donald Trump’s third wild and tumultuous day at a United Nations conference in New York. The White House planned to focus on combating Iran’s nuclear ambitions, warning that China allegedly is trying to interfere in the midterm elections, and raising hopes that a nuclear disarmament deal with North Korea could be within reach.

Obscure Pentagon Fund Nets $2B, Sets Pork Senses Tingling
Program prompts complaints of ‘jurassic pork’ as some see earmarks by another name

Where supporters see a way to bankroll innovate programs that the military may not even know it needs, critics see pork by another name. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Pentagon will soon have received about $2.3 billion in the last nine years — money the military never requested — for a special fund intended to help replace earmarks after Congress banned them, our analysis shows.

Buried deep inside the $674.4 billion Defense spending measure for fiscal 2019 that the Senate is expected to vote on this week is a chart with one line showing a $250 million appropriation for the Defense Rapid Innovation Fund, the latest installment of sizable funding for a largely unknown program that quietly disburses scores of contracts every year.

Leahy Endorses Return of Spending Bill Earmarks
Doing so could allow for orderly, timely appropriations process, Vermont Democrat says

Remarks by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., on bringing back earmarks echo similar ones expressed by House Minority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The top Democrat on the Senate Appropriations Committee would like to bring earmarks back to the appropriations process, restoring a practice banned in 2011 after several years of scandals and negative publicity.

Vermont Sen. Patrick J. Leahy told C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers” on Friday that there’s “no question” that once again allowing earmarks is one way lawmakers can have an orderly, timely process for annual appropriations bills.

15 Members Pledge to Withhold Speaker Vote Without Rule Changes
8 Democrats, 7 Republicans part of bipartisan Problems Solvers Caucus

Rep. Tom O’Halleran, D-Ariz., said he will not vote for a speaker who doesn’t back the Problem Solvers Caucus proposed rule changes for making the House more bipartisan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least 15 members of the bipartisan Problems Solvers Caucus have pledged to withhold their vote for speaker if the candidate that emerges as the majority party’s nominee does not back the caucus’s proposed rule changes.

The Problem Solvers unveiled a package of rules changes in late July dubbed “Break the Gridlock.” The proposals aim to open up the legislative process in a way that prioritizes bipartisanship.