Thomas Massie

GOP Chaos, Confusion Ahead of Thursday Immigration Votes
Prospects for passage appeared poor amid haphazard whip effort

Attorney General Jeff Sessions went to the House to ask Republicans to support the immigration bills the chamber will consider Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Confusion and chaos ensued Wednesday as House Republican leaders conducted a haphazard whip effort on a compromise immigration bill they planned to bring to the floor the next day. The prospects for the bill passing were clearly poor.

The frenetic feel of the day was similar to March 23, 2017. House GOP leaders spent that day engulfed in conversations with members as they tried to whip support for their bill to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law in an effort to vote on the law’s anniversary.

Rep. Massie Seeks K Street Campaign Cash After Blasting Lobbyist
Kentucky GOP lawmaker plans cigar and bourbon bash with downtown denizens this week.

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., is seeking campaign cash from the industry he had some choice words for recently.. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Thomas Massie created a fuss on K Street last week in chastising an unnamed lobbyist whom he said offered to help him raise money to secure a seat on the Ways and Means Committee. But apparently, the Kentucky Republican still wants political donations from K Street — in a smoke-filled room, no less, according to an invitation obtained by Roll Call.

Massie, in a documentary series called “The Swamp,” said a medical device industry lobbyist proposed helping him raise campaign money and assisting him in getting on the tax-writing and health-focused Ways and Means panel, according to a report in Politico.

Analysis: Leadership Race Not Over Despite Scalise Declining to Challenge McCarthy
McCarthy still needs to shore up support from conservatives, GOP candidates

From left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., are presenting a united front for now about the future leadership lineup. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republican leaders made moves Thursday to give the appearance that there won’t be any infighting about who should replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan as head of the conference. Don’t be fooled.

The race to replace Ryan is not over — unless Republicans lose the majority in November. In that scenario, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy would have the insider track to being elected minority leader since it would only require a simple majority vote of the GOP conference.

Read the Bill or Get Out of Town Quickly? On Omnibus, Congress Chooses the Latter
‘This is a Great Dane-sized whiz down the leg of every taxpayer in America,’ Sen. Kennedy says

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., compared the process of considering the omnibus appropriations package to a big dog urinating on taxpayers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Congress stares at a Friday deadline to fund the government, the reality that members will have scant time to actually read or process the $1.3 trillion fiscal 2018 omnibus before voting on it is starting to sink in.

The Wednesday night filing of the more than 2,200-page measure was the starting pistol that sent lawmakers into a mad dash against the government funding clock. They were given 52 hours.

NRA, Pro-Gun Lawmaker Exchange Fire Over New Bill
Kentucky GOP Rep. Massie says bill, which NRA supports, advances Obama’s agenda

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., is at odds with the NRA over his criticism of a bill that seeks to address deficiencies in the national gun background check database. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Kentucky Rep. Thomas Massie butted heads with the National Rifle Association Thursday over a new bill in Congress that addresses deficiencies in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), the database of people who are not allowed to buy firearms in America.

The NRA, which has given more than $4,500 to Massie’s campaigns, said on its website the congressman was spreading misinformation about the bipartisan bill.

House Adopts Budget Resolution Paving Way for Tax Package
Measure could increase deficit by $1.5 trillion

The House adopted a budget resolution that is the GOP’s vehicle for a tax overhaul measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House on Thursday adopted a fiscal 2018 budget resolution by a narrow margin, with supporters acknowledging it was little more than a vehicle for a still-developing tax measure.

“Most importantly this budget that we passed today brings us one step closer to tax reform,” House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said. 

Word on the Hill: Gifts for McCain
Partnership for Public Service awards, and staffer shuffle

A banner for Sen. John McCain flew over the University of Phoenix stadium. (Courtesy UltraViolet)

You would think it was Sen. John McCain’s birthday again. Since the Arizona Republican announced his opposition to the Graham-Cassidy health care bill, liberal groups have given him a cake, sent him cupcakes and flown a banner over the site of an NFL game.

UltraViolet delivered a cake to McCain’s Phoenix office Tuesday, and the women’s advocacy group also delivered one to the Portland office of Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine. The group chartered a plane to fly over the University of Phoenix Stadium before Monday’s Cardinals vs. Cowboys NFL game, thanking McCain for his opposition to the bill. Tailgaters and those preparing for the game were able to spot it, including reporter Ryan Haarer.

Congress Braces for Tense Debate on Surveillance Law
Spy agencies argue for permanent reauthorization of FISA amendments

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., is sponsoring legislation to reauthorize the 2012 FISA amendments with no sunsets. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers are facing a potentially bruising fight over a surveillance law that expires Dec. 31 and must be extended in time to preserve what U.S. spy agencies consider a vital piece of their arsenal.

Congress has to extend the 2012 FISA Amendments Act, which will pit the Trump administration and national security hawks in Congress who favor a permanent reauthorization with no changes, against lawmakers of both parties, libertarians, privacy advocates and communications companies seeking to tighten protections for U.S. persons whose communications may get caught up in the wide electronic net cast by spy agencies.

Northern Kentucky Chamber Tweets Massie ‘Piece of S--t’ After Harvey Vote
#sassywithmassie laughs off the incident by turning it on the bill he voted against

Kentucky Republican Rep. Thomas Massie was one of three members of the House who voted against the Hurricane Harvey recovery bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce’s president apologized Wednesday for the chamber’s account tweeting that Republican Rep. Thomas Massie was a “piece of s--t.”

The tweet, which was later deleted, came from the chamber’s account in response to news that Massie was one of three members of Congress who voted against aid for victims of Hurricane Harvey, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported. 

House Passes Sanctions on Iran, Russia and North Korea
After procedural delays, bill sent to Senate

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., accused Iran, Russia and North Korea of seeking to undermine the United States after the House passed a bill Tuesday aimed at imposing sanctions on the three nations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A bill aimed at imposing sanctions on Iran, Russia and North Korea passed the House 419-3 Tuesday after being held up by technical delays for weeks. But its fate in the Senate remains unclear.

The bill was largely lauded by leadership as a bipartisan effort.